Cancers of the Tongue and Floor of Mouth: Five-Year File Audit Within the Acute Phase Purpose The impact of patient, surgical, and rehabilitation factors on speech and swallowing in the acute phase for patients following tongue and/or floor of mouth cancer surgery has not been reported to date. This study reviewed functional outcomes over a 5-year period at an Australian tertiary hospital. Method ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2014
Cancers of the Tongue and Floor of Mouth: Five-Year File Audit Within the Acute Phase
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katrina M. Blyth
    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Patricia McCabe
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Robert Heard
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Jonathan Clark
    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia
  • Catherine Madill
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Kirrie J. Ballard
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Katrina M. Blyth: kgro3639@uni.sydney.edu.au
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Nancy Solomon
    Associate Editor: Nancy Solomon×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2014
Cancers of the Tongue and Floor of Mouth: Five-Year File Audit Within the Acute Phase
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2014, Vol. 23, 668-678. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-14-0003
History: Received January 6, 2014 , Revised April 28, 2014 , Accepted July 23, 2014
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2014, Vol. 23, 668-678. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-14-0003
History: Received January 6, 2014; Revised April 28, 2014; Accepted July 23, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The impact of patient, surgical, and rehabilitation factors on speech and swallowing in the acute phase for patients following tongue and/or floor of mouth cancer surgery has not been reported to date. This study reviewed functional outcomes over a 5-year period at an Australian tertiary hospital.

Method Patient medical files from July 2006 through 2011 were audited. Patient demographics, tumor and treatment, along with speech-language pathology (SLP) intervention details were examined.

Results Speech and swallow function were significantly different between those with primary closure and those requiring reconstruction, with significantly higher referral rate to SLP following reconstruction. The clinical speech and swallow function at SLP assessment following reconstruction was a predictor for the number of SLP intervention sessions provided. The number of intervention sessions provided to these patients significantly correlated with upgrade in fluids during hospitalization.

Conclusion This is the first published study to report a relationship between function and dosage of clinical SLP intervention with this population. It is also the first known study to audit comprehensive functional outcomes in the acute phase of recovery with an Australian cohort. The findings contribute to establishing evidence-based SLP practice with this population.

Acknowledgments
Many thanks to staff in the medical record department as well as the head and neck data manager at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. This study was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Scholarship awarded to Katrina M. Blyth. The results of this study were presented at the Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Cancer Society 14th Annual Scientific Meeting combined with International Federation of Head and Neck Oncolic Societies 2012 World Tour, Brisbane, Australia, October 2012.
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