Description of an Intensive Residential Aphasia Treatment Program: Rationale, Clinical Processes, and Outcomes Purpose The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, clinical processes, and outcomes of an intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP). Method Seventy-three community-dwelling adults with aphasia completed a residentially based ICAP. Participants received 5 hr of daily 1:1 evidence-based cognitive-linguistically oriented aphasia therapy, supplemented with weekly socially ... Supplement
Supplement  |   May 2014
Description of an Intensive Residential Aphasia Treatment Program: Rationale, Clinical Processes, and Outcomes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronda L. Winans-Mitrik
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • William D. Hula
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Michael W. Dickey
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • James G. Schumacher
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Brooke Swoyer
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Patrick J. Doyle
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Patrick J. Doyle: patrick.doyle@va.gov
  • Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Editor: Swathi Kiran×
  • Associate Editor: Leora Cherney
    Associate Editor: Leora Cherney×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Select Papers From the 43rd Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement   |   May 2014
Description of an Intensive Residential Aphasia Treatment Program: Rationale, Clinical Processes, and Outcomes
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S330-S342. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0102
History: Received August 19, 2013 , Revised November 12, 2013 , Accepted January 31, 2014
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S330-S342. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0102
History: Received August 19, 2013; Revised November 12, 2013; Accepted January 31, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, clinical processes, and outcomes of an intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP).

Method Seventy-three community-dwelling adults with aphasia completed a residentially based ICAP. Participants received 5 hr of daily 1:1 evidence-based cognitive-linguistically oriented aphasia therapy, supplemented with weekly socially oriented and therapeutic group activities over a 23-day treatment course. Standardized measures of aphasia severity and communicative functioning were obtained at baseline, program entry, program exit, and follow-up. Results were analyzed using a Bayesian latent growth curve model with 2 factors representing (a) the initial level and (b) change over time, respectively, for each outcome measure.

Results Model parameter estimates showed reliable improvement on all outcome measures between the initial and final assessments. Improvement during the treatment interval was greater than change observed across the baseline interval, and gains were maintained at follow-up on all measures.

Conclusions The rationale, clinical processes, and outcomes of a residentially based ICAP have been described. ICAPs differ with respect to treatments delivered, dosing parameters, and outcomes measured. Specifying the defining components of complex interventions, establishing their feasibility, and describing their outcomes are necessary to guide the development of controlled clinical trials.

Acknowledgments
PIRATE is a clinical demonstration project supported by VA Pittsburgh's Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center. We wish to acknowledge the invaluable contributions of Shannon Austermann Hula, Carol Dolbee, Malcolm R. McNeil, Michelle Rossi, and Mary Sullivan, as well as both past and current PIRATE speech pathologists Michael Biel, Geoffrey Fredericks, Beth Friedman, Christine Matthews, Rebecca Owens, and Cheralyn Ranjan.
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