Effect of Verb Network Strengthening Treatment (VNeST) in Persons With Aphasia: Extension and Replication of Previous Findings Purpose Verb Network Strengthening Treatment (VNeST) is an aphasia treatment that targets verbs (e.g., measure) and their related thematic roles (e.g., carpenter–lumber). Previous studies reported encouraging results in a number of participants using single-subject design with improvements observed on naming, sentence production, and discourse. The purpose of the current study ... Supplement
Supplement  |   May 2014
Effect of Verb Network Strengthening Treatment (VNeST) in Persons With Aphasia: Extension and Replication of Previous Findings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa A. Edmonds
    Brain Rehabilitation and Research Center, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Kevin Mammino
    Brain Rehabilitation and Research Center, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
  • Jimena Ojeda
    Brain Rehabilitation and Research Center, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Lisa A. Edmonds: edmonds@ufl.edu
  • Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Editor: Swathi Kiran×
  • Associate Editor: Yasmeen Faroqi-Shah
    Associate Editor: Yasmeen Faroqi-Shah×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Select Papers From the 43rd Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement   |   May 2014
Effect of Verb Network Strengthening Treatment (VNeST) in Persons With Aphasia: Extension and Replication of Previous Findings
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S312-S329. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0098
History: Received August 16, 2013 , Revised January 24, 2014 , Accepted February 25, 2014
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S312-S329. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0098
History: Received August 16, 2013; Revised January 24, 2014; Accepted February 25, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose Verb Network Strengthening Treatment (VNeST) is an aphasia treatment that targets verbs (e.g., measure) and their related thematic roles (e.g., carpenter–lumber). Previous studies reported encouraging results in a number of participants using single-subject design with improvements observed on naming, sentence production, and discourse. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a group analysis evaluating the effect of VNeST on similar outcomes.

Method A multiple baseline design across participants was conducted with 11 persons with aphasia due to stroke. Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests were used to evaluate potential improvement from pre- to posttreatment and maintenance. Individual effect sizes were also calculated to evaluate magnitude of change within and across participants.

Results Results showed significant improvement at posttreatment and maintenance on trained and untrained sentence probes and object and action naming. Improvement in the production of sentences not targeted in treatment was nonsignificant at posttreatment assessment but significant at maintenance. Moderate increases in percentage of complete utterances and overall informativeness were observed on discourse.

Conclusion The results of this study replicate previous findings and provide evidence that VNeST may promote specific and generalized lexical retrieval abilities and affect basic syntax production in both constrained and discourse production tasks.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Rehabilitation Research and Development Grant 1I01RX000563-01 (to Lisa A. Edmonds). We acknowledge the research participants and their families for their enthusiasm and motivation throughout. We also extend our thanks to the following collaborators, research assistants, and clinicians in the Aphasia Lab at the Brain Rehabilitation and Research Center at the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center and Brooks Rehabilitation in Jacksonville, FL: Sam Wu, Jodi Morgan, Ceil Brooks, Brayleah Kernan, Flo Singletary, and Carolyn Hanson.
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