Supporting Narrative Retells for People With Aphasia Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Photographs or Line Drawings? Text or No Text? Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine how the interface design of an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device influences the communication behaviors of people with aphasia during a narrative retell task. Method A case-series design was used. Four narratives were created on an AAC device with ... Supplement
Supplement  |   May 2014

© 2012 Dynavox Mayer-Johnson. All rights reserved.

Supporting Narrative Retells for People With Aphasia Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Photographs or Line Drawings? Text or No Text?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie Griffith
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Aimee Dietz
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Kristy Weissling
    University of Nebraska—Lincoln
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Julie Griffith: griff2jd@mail.uc.edu
  • Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Editor: Swathi Kiran×
  • Associate Editor: Gloria Olness
    Associate Editor: Gloria Olness×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Select Papers From the 43rd Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement   |   May 2014
Supporting Narrative Retells for People With Aphasia Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Photographs or Line Drawings? Text or No Text?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S213-S224. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0089
History: Received August 6, 2013 , Revised January 10, 2014 , Accepted March 2, 2014
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S213-S224. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0089
History: Received August 6, 2013; Revised January 10, 2014; Accepted March 2, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine how the interface design of an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device influences the communication behaviors of people with aphasia during a narrative retell task.

Method A case-series design was used. Four narratives were created on an AAC device with combinations of personally relevant (PR) photographs, line drawings (LDs), and text for each participant. The narrative retells were analyzed to describe the expressive modality units (EMUs) used, trouble sources experienced, and whether trouble sources were repaired. The researchers also explored the participants' perceived helpfulness of the interface features.

Results The participants primarily used spoken EMUs to retell their narratives. They relied on PR photographs more frequently than LDs; however, they reported both picture types to be equally helpful. Text was frequently used and reported as helpful by all 4 people with aphasia. Participants experienced similar rates of trouble sources across conditions; however, they displayed unique trends for successful repairs of trouble sources.

Conclusion For narrative retells, LDs may serve as an effective visual support when PR photographs are unavailable. Individual assessment is necessary to determine the optimum combination of supports in AAC systems for people with aphasia.

Acknowledgment
Portions of this article were presented at the 2013 Clinical Aphasiology Conference in Tucson, AZ, and the 2013 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Chicago, IL. We thank Brittany Sileo Fehskens, Bridget Brown, Devan Macke, and Jennifer Keelor for their contributions to this project. We are also grateful for the participants' time and effort.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access