Dosing of a Cued Picture-Naming Treatment for Anomia Purpose Recent investigations into effects of intensity or distribution of aphasia therapy have provided moderate evidence supporting intensive therapy schedules on aphasia treatment response. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of creating an intensive therapy session without extending the amount of daily time a person ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   May 01, 2014
Dosing of a Cued Picture-Naming Treatment for Anomia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stacy M. Harnish
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Jodi Morgan
    Brooks Rehabilitation Clinical Research Center, Jacksonville, FL
  • Jennifer P. Lundine
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Andrew Bauer
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Floris Singletary
    Brooks Rehabilitation Clinical Research Center, Jacksonville, FL
  • Michelle L. Benjamin
    University of Alabama—Birmingham
  • Leslie J. Gonzalez Rothi
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Bruce Crosson
    Atlanta VA Medical Center Rehabilitation Research & Development Center of Excellence for Visual and Neurocognitive Rehabilitation, Decatur, GA
    Emory University, Atlanta, GA
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Stacy M. Harnish: harnish.18@osu.edu
  • Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Editor: Swathi Kiran×
  • Associate Editor: Sharon Antonucci
    Associate Editor: Sharon Antonucci×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Select Papers From the 43rd Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   May 01, 2014
Dosing of a Cued Picture-Naming Treatment for Anomia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S285-S299. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0081
History: Received August 2, 2013 , Revised November 8, 2013 , Accepted December 28, 2013
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S285-S299. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0081
History: Received August 2, 2013; Revised November 8, 2013; Accepted December 28, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

Purpose Recent investigations into effects of intensity or distribution of aphasia therapy have provided moderate evidence supporting intensive therapy schedules on aphasia treatment response. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of creating an intensive therapy session without extending the amount of daily time a person spends in treatment.

Method Individuals who presented with chronic anomia poststroke (N = 8) participated in 2 weeks of a computerized, therapist-delivered, cued, picture-naming treatment. Dosing parameters for each session were 8 presentations of 50 pictures, totaling 400 teaching episodes per session.

Results Of the 8 participants, 6 achieved significant increases from baseline on trained items after 400 teaching episodes (i.e., 1 treatment hr), and the remaining 2 participants achieved significant increases from baseline after 1200 teaching episodes (i.e., 3 treatment hr). Maintenance data from 7 of the participants indicated that 6 participants maintained significant improvement from baseline on trained items.

Conclusions Given an intensive and saturated context, anomic individuals were surprisingly quick at relearning to produce problematic words successfully. Most participants demonstrated retention of the gains 2 months after treatment ended. The high density of teaching episodes within the treatment session (i.e., the intensive treatment schedule) may have contributed to the behavioral gains.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Grant C7175M SH the VA Health Administration and a Brooks Endowment (awarded to the last author). The contents do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States Government.
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