Can Human Mannequin-Based Simulation Provide a Feasible and Clinically Acceptable Method for Training Tracheostomy Management Skills for Speech-Language Pathologists? Purpose Workplace training for tracheostomy management is currently recognized to be inconsistent and insufficient. A novel approach, using technology-enhanced simulation, may provide a solution to training tracheostomy management skills by providing a consistent, time-efficient, and risk-free learning environment. The current research evaluated clinicians' tracheostomy skills acquisition after training in a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 2014
Can Human Mannequin-Based Simulation Provide a Feasible and Clinically Acceptable Method for Training Tracheostomy Management Skills for Speech-Language Pathologists?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth C. Ward
    Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Sonia C. Baker
    Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia
  • Laurelie R. Wall
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Brooke L. J. Duggan
    Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia
  • Kelli L. Hancock
    Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia
  • Lynell V. Bassett
    Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia
  • Trent J. Hyde
    Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Elizabeth C. Ward: liz.ward@uq.edu.au
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Jane Mertz Garcia
    Associate Editor: Jane Mertz Garcia×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 2014
Can Human Mannequin-Based Simulation Provide a Feasible and Clinically Acceptable Method for Training Tracheostomy Management Skills for Speech-Language Pathologists?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2014, Vol. 23, 421-436. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0050
History: Received May 16, 2013 , Revised August 11, 2013 , Accepted February 1, 2014
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2014, Vol. 23, 421-436. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0050
History: Received May 16, 2013; Revised August 11, 2013; Accepted February 1, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Workplace training for tracheostomy management is currently recognized to be inconsistent and insufficient. A novel approach, using technology-enhanced simulation, may provide a solution to training tracheostomy management skills by providing a consistent, time-efficient, and risk-free learning environment. The current research evaluated clinicians' tracheostomy skills acquisition after training in a simulated learning environment and explored changes in clinicians' confidence and perceptions after the experience.

Method Forty-two clinicians with no or low levels of tracheostomy skill attended one of six, 1-day simulation courses. The training involved both part–task skill learning and immersive simulated scenarios. To evaluate clinicians' acquisition of manual skills, performance of core tasks during the scenarios was assessed by independent observers. Questionnaires were used to examine perceived outcomes, benefits, and perceptions of the learning environment at pre-, post-, and 4 months post-training.

Results Only 1 clinician failed to successfully execute all core practical tasks. Clinicians' confidence increased significantly ( p < .05) from pre- to post-workshop and was maintained to 4 months post-workshop across most parameters. All clinicians reported positive perceptions regarding their learning outcomes and learning in a simulated environment.

Conclusion These findings validate the use of simulation as a clinical training medium and support its future use in tracheostomy competency-training pathways.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to acknowledge funding received through the Allied Health Workforce and Training Unit and the Health Practitioner Grant Scheme, Queensland Health. The authors also thank the staff at the CSDS service, located at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, for their training and support, and the research participants for their time.
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