Does Brain Volume Loss Predict Cognitive and Narrative Discourse Performance Following Traumatic Brain Injury? Purpose In this study, the authors investigated the relationship between brain volume loss and performance on cognitive measures, including working memory, immediate memory, executive functions, and intelligence, and a narrative discourse production task. An underlying goal was to examine the prognostic potential of a brain lesion metric for discourse outcomes. ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   May 01, 2014
Does Brain Volume Loss Predict Cognitive and Narrative Discourse Performance Following Traumatic Brain Injury?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Lê
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Carl Coelho
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Jennifer Mozeiko
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Frank Krueger
    George Mason University, Arlington, VA
  • Jordan Grafman
    Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, IL
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Karen Le: karen.le@uconn.edu
  • Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Editor: Swathi Kiran×
  • Associate Editor: Melissa Duff
    Associate Editor: Melissa Duff×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Supplement: Select Papers From the 43rd Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   May 01, 2014
Does Brain Volume Loss Predict Cognitive and Narrative Discourse Performance Following Traumatic Brain Injury?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S271-S284. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0095
History: Received August 15, 2013 , Revised November 9, 2013 , Accepted November 14, 2013
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, S271-S284. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0095
History: Received August 15, 2013; Revised November 9, 2013; Accepted November 14, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose In this study, the authors investigated the relationship between brain volume loss and performance on cognitive measures, including working memory, immediate memory, executive functions, and intelligence, and a narrative discourse production task. An underlying goal was to examine the prognostic potential of a brain lesion metric for discourse outcomes. It was hypothesized that brain volume loss would correlate with and predict cognitive and narrative discourse measures and have prognostic value for discourse outcomes.

Method One hundred sixty-seven individuals with penetrating head injury participated. Correlational and regression analyses were performed for the percentages of total brain and hemispheric volume loss and scores on 4 cognitive measures (WMS–III Working Memory and Immediate Memory primary indexes, D-KEFS Sorting Test, and WAIS–III Full Scale IQ) and 7 narrative discourse measures (T-units, grammatical complexity, cohesion, local and global coherence, story completeness, and story grammar).

Results The volumetric measures had significant small-to-moderate correlations with all cognitive measures but only one significant correlation with the discourse measures. Findings from regression analyses were analogous but revealed several models that approached significance.

Conclusion Findings suggest that an overall measure of brain damage may be more predictive of general cognitive status than of narrative discourse ability. Atrophy measures in specific brain regions may be more informative.

Acknowledgments
Research reported in this publication was partially supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant F31DC012748. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of the late Carol Frattali to the design of the language and narrative discourse tasks during Phase 3 of the VHIS. For more information on the Vietnam Head Injury Study (VHIS), contact Jordan Grafman at jgrafman@ric.org.
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