Using Informative Verbal Exchanges to Promote Verb Retrieval in Nonfluent Aphasia Purpose The goal of this study was to determine whether positive treatment effects of a modified constraint-induced language therapy focused on verb production would generalize to unpracticed items and tasks. Method Four individuals participated in a single-subject treatment design protocol. The treatment involved intensive practice producing verbs in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2014
Using Informative Verbal Exchanges to Promote Verb Retrieval in Nonfluent Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristen K. Maul
    Lehman College, Bronx, NY
  • Peggy S. Conner
    Lehman College, Bronx, NY
  • Daniel Kempler
    Emerson College, Boston, MA
  • Christina Radvanski
    Lehman College, Bronx, NY
  • Mira Goral
    Lehman College, Bronx, NY
    The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, NY
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Kristen K. Maul, who is now with Gallaudet University: kristen.maul@gallaudet.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Heather Wright
    Associate Editor: Heather Wright×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2014
Using Informative Verbal Exchanges to Promote Verb Retrieval in Nonfluent Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2014, Vol. 23, 407-420. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0004
History: Received January 10, 2013 , Revised July 12, 2013 , Accepted December 17, 2013
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2014, Vol. 23, 407-420. doi:10.1044/2014_AJSLP-13-0004
History: Received January 10, 2013; Revised July 12, 2013; Accepted December 17, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The goal of this study was to determine whether positive treatment effects of a modified constraint-induced language therapy focused on verb production would generalize to unpracticed items and tasks.

Method Four individuals participated in a single-subject treatment design protocol. The treatment involved intensive practice producing verbs in sentences in an informative communicative exchange. Direct treatment outcome was examined by measuring the accuracy of producing practiced verbs in an action description task, a task similar to those used in treatment. Generalization was assessed by measuring production of unpracticed verbs and sentence grammaticality in the action description task and by measuring verb production and sentence grammaticality in 2 relatively unstructured (unpracticed) language tasks.

Results Two of the 4 participants showed a direct treatment effect, producing a greater number of practiced verbs in the action description task following treatment compared with before treatment. All participants improved sentence grammaticality following treatment, although grammaticality was not explicitly targeted in therapy. Generalization to unpracticed, less-structured tasks was variable across the participants.

Conclusion Patterns of generalization may depend on participants' specific language deficits and production characteristics, on the language tasks used, and on the measures used to detect change and assess generalization.

Acknowledgments
This project was made possible through support for Mira Goral provided by National Institutes of Health Grant DC009792. We thank our participants and we thank Dagmar Alvarado, Lauren Brizzolara, Maria Boklan, Ruth Ginsburg, Jungna Kim, Lindsey Doolittle, Pamela Mizrachi, Youngmi Park, Vanessa Smith, and Stephanie Wolfe for testing and providing treatment. Thanks to the Neurolinguistics Lab and the Speech-Language Clinic at Lehman College.
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