Phonological Assessment and Analysis of Bilingual Preschoolers' Spanish and English Word Productions Purpose The major purpose of this study was to examine Spanish and English phonological productions (patterns/deviations) of typically developing bilingual preschool children. Phonological scores were compared in order to determine if significant differences exist between (a) boys and girls, (b) 4- and 5-year-olds, and/or (c) their productions of Spanish and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2014
Phonological Assessment and Analysis of Bilingual Preschoolers' Spanish and English Word Productions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Raúl Francisco Prezas
    Wichita State University, KS
  • Barbara Williams Hodson
    Wichita State University, KS
  • Marlene Schommer-Aikins
    Wichita State University, KS
  • Disclosure: A published test by the second author (Hodson Assessment of Phonological Patterns—Third Edition; Hodson, 2004) and computer software (Hodson Computerized Analysis of Phonological Patterns; Hodson, 2003) were used in this study. The other instrument (revised version of the Assessment of Phonological Processes—Spanish) is unpublished.
    Disclosure: A published test by the second author (Hodson Assessment of Phonological Patterns—Third Edition; Hodson, 2004) and computer software (Hodson Computerized Analysis of Phonological Patterns; Hodson, 2003) were used in this study. The other instrument (revised version of the Assessment of Phonological Processes—Spanish) is unpublished.×
  • Correspondence to Raúl Francisco Prezas: raul.prezas@gpisd.org
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Ken Bleile
    Associate Editor: Ken Bleile×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2014
Phonological Assessment and Analysis of Bilingual Preschoolers' Spanish and English Word Productions
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, 176-185. doi:10.1044/2013_AJSLP-12-0132
History: Received October 3, 2012 , Revised April 7, 2013 , Accepted October 27, 2013
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, 176-185. doi:10.1044/2013_AJSLP-12-0132
History: Received October 3, 2012; Revised April 7, 2013; Accepted October 27, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The major purpose of this study was to examine Spanish and English phonological productions (patterns/deviations) of typically developing bilingual preschool children. Phonological scores were compared in order to determine if significant differences exist between (a) boys and girls, (b) 4- and 5-year-olds, and/or (c) their productions of Spanish and English words.

Method Fifty-six bilingual 4- and 5-year-old children (27 boys and 29 girls) who attended Head Start programs named stimulus items for Spanish and English phonological assessment instruments that were similar in procedures and analyses.

Results Multivariate analyses indicated no significant differences for phonological scores between boys and girls or between the 2 languages. Differences between the 4- and 5-year-olds, however, were significant, with the 5-year-olds performing better than the 4-year-olds. Liquid deviations and omissions of consonants in clusters/sequences were the most frequently occurring phonological deviations.

Conclusions Phonological score differences between typically developing bilingual Spanish–English-speaking preschool boys and girls from similar backgrounds are not likely to be significant. Better phonological scores, however, can be expected for 5-year-olds than for 4-year-olds. Moreover, phonological deviation percentage scores of typically developing bilingual children for comparable Spanish and English assessment instruments are likely to be similar.

Acknowledgments
This research was possible because of the participation and support of staff, families, and children from the Head Start program in Wichita, KS. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of Anthony DiLollo, Kathy Strattman, and the late Kenneth Burk for their input and suggestions regarding this study. We also express appreciation to Lacey Stratton for serving as our phonetic transcription assistant.
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