An Evaluation of Reading Comprehension of Expository Text in Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury Purpose This project was conducted to obtain information about reading problems of adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with mild-to-moderate cognitive impairments and to investigate how these readers respond to reading comprehension strategy prompts integrated into digital versions of text. Method Participants from 2 groups, adults with TBI ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2014
An Evaluation of Reading Comprehension of Expository Text in Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • McKay Moore Sohlberg
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Gina G. Griffiths
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Stephen Fickas
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to McKay Moore Sohlberg: mckay@uoregon.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Carl Coelho
    Associate Editor: Carl Coelho×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2014
An Evaluation of Reading Comprehension of Expository Text in Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, 160-175. doi:10.1044/2013_AJSLP-12-0005
History: Received January 13, 2012 , Revised April 4, 2013 , Accepted October 27, 2013
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2014, Vol. 23, 160-175. doi:10.1044/2013_AJSLP-12-0005
History: Received January 13, 2012; Revised April 4, 2013; Accepted October 27, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Purpose This project was conducted to obtain information about reading problems of adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with mild-to-moderate cognitive impairments and to investigate how these readers respond to reading comprehension strategy prompts integrated into digital versions of text.

Method Participants from 2 groups, adults with TBI (n = 15) and matched controls (n = 15), read 4 different 500-word expository science passages linked to either a strategy prompt condition or a no-strategy prompt condition. The participants' reading comprehension was evaluated using sentence verification and free recall tasks.

Results The TBI and control groups exhibited significant differences on 2 of the 5 reading comprehension measures: paraphrase statements on a sentence verification task and communication units on a free recall task. Unexpected group differences were noted on the participants' prerequisite reading skills. For the within-group comparison, participants showed significantly higher reading comprehension scores on 2 free recall measures: words per communication unit and type–token ratio. There were no significant interactions.

Conclusion The results help to elucidate the nature of reading comprehension in adults with TBI with mild-to-moderate cognitive impairments and endorse further evaluation of reading comprehension strategies as a potential intervention option for these individuals. Future research is needed to better understand how individual differences influence a person's reading and response to intervention.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation New Century Scholars Fund.
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