Use of the Children's Communication Checklist—2 for Classification of Language Impairment Risk in Young School-Age Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Purpose Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at elevated risk for language impairment (LI). This study examined the feasibility of using the Children's Communication Checklist—2 (CCC–2; Bishop, 2006) to classify risk for LI in young children, ages 5–8 years, with ADHD. Method Parents of 32 children with ADHD ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2014
Use of the Children's Communication Checklist—2 for Classification of Language Impairment Risk in Young School-Age Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Geralyn R. Timler
    Miami University, Oxford, OH
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Geralyn R. Timler: timlergr@miamioh.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Sean Redmond
    Associate Editor: Sean Redmond×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2014
Use of the Children's Communication Checklist—2 for Classification of Language Impairment Risk in Young School-Age Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2014, Vol. 23, 73-83. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0164)
History: Received December 17, 2012 , Revised April 24, 2013 , Accepted July 18, 2013
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2014, Vol. 23, 73-83. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0164)
History: Received December 17, 2012; Revised April 24, 2013; Accepted July 18, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at elevated risk for language impairment (LI). This study examined the feasibility of using the Children's Communication Checklist—2 (CCC–2; Bishop, 2006) to classify risk for LI in young children, ages 5–8 years, with ADHD.

Method Parents of 32 children with ADHD and 12 typically developing peers completed the CCC–2. The Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Fourth Edition (Semel, Wiig, & Secord, 2003) and the Test of Narrative Language (Gillam & Pearson, 2004) were administered to diagnose LI. Language samples were collected to examine clinical markers of LI.

Results CCC–2 General Communication Composite scores ≤ 85 correctly classified 10 participants with ADHD diagnosed with LI as defined by composite scores ≤ 85 on the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Fourth Edition, or on the Test of Narrative Language. Five of these participants demonstrated 1 or more clinical markers of LI in language samples. Three additional participants, who received a General Communication Composite score ≤ 85 yet scored above 85 on the language tests, demonstrated CCC–2 profiles suggestive of pragmatic impairment. Sensitivity and specificity rates were 100% and 85.29%, respectively. CCC–2 scores and most measures were significantly correlated.

Conclusion The results support the feasibility of using the CCC–2 as a screener to identify children with ADHD who are at elevated risk for LI and need referral for comprehensive assessment.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a New Century Scholars Research Grant from the ASHFoundation. Appreciation is extended to William Pelham and his staff at the University at Buffalo's Center for Children and Families (now located at Florida International University) for assistance with participant recruitment as well as to Dawn Vogler-Elias and Nikki Harty for assistance in data reduction and supervision of student research assistants.
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