Factors That Enhance English-Speaking Speech-Language Pathologists' Transcription of Cantonese-Speaking Children's Consonants Purpose To investigate speech-language pathology students' ability to identify errors and transcribe typical and atypical speech in Cantonese, a nonnative language. Method Thirty-three English-speaking speech-language pathology students completed 3 tasks in an experimental within-subjects design. Results Task 1 (baseline) involved transcribing English words. In Task 2, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2013
Factors That Enhance English-Speaking Speech-Language Pathologists' Transcription of Cantonese-Speaking Children's Consonants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebekah Lockart
    Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
  • Sharynne McLeod
    Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, Australia
  • Correspondence to Sharynne McLeod: smcleod@csu.edu.au
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Peter Flipsen Jr.
    Associate Editor: Peter Flipsen Jr.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2013
Factors That Enhance English-Speaking Speech-Language Pathologists' Transcription of Cantonese-Speaking Children's Consonants
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2013, Vol. 22, 523-539. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/12-0009)
History: Received January 30, 2012 , Revised May 28, 2012 , Accepted December 23, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2013, Vol. 22, 523-539. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/12-0009)
History: Received January 30, 2012; Revised May 28, 2012; Accepted December 23, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose To investigate speech-language pathology students' ability to identify errors and transcribe typical and atypical speech in Cantonese, a nonnative language.

Method Thirty-three English-speaking speech-language pathology students completed 3 tasks in an experimental within-subjects design.

Results Task 1 (baseline) involved transcribing English words. In Task 2, students transcribed 25 words spoken by a Cantonese adult. An average of 59.1% consonants was transcribed correctly (72.9% when Cantonese–English transfer patterns were allowed). There was higher accuracy on shared English and Cantonese syllable-initial consonants /m,n,f,s,h,j,w,l/ and syllable-final consonants. In Task 3, students identified consonant errors and transcribed 100 words spoken by Cantonese-speaking children under 4 additive conditions: (1) baseline, (2) +adult model, (3) +information about Cantonese phonology, and (4) all variables (2 and 3 were counterbalanced). There was a significant improvement in the students' identification and transcription scores for conditions 2, 3, and 4, with a moderate effect size. Increased skill was not based on listeners' proficiency in speaking another language, perceived transcription skill, musicality, or confidence with multilingual clients.

Conclusion Speech-language pathology students, with no exposure to or specific training in Cantonese, have some skills to identify errors and transcribe Cantonese. Provision of a Cantonese-adult model and information about Cantonese phonology increased students' accuracy in transcribing Cantonese speech.

Acknowledgments
This research comprised the first author's master's research, supervised by the second author. It was supported by Australian Research Council Future Fellowship FT0990588 awarded to the second author. The authors acknowledge insights and support from Carol Kit Sum To, Peter Petocz, David McKinnon, Lena Danaia, and Linda J. Harrison.
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