Validating Dynamic Assessment of Triadic Gaze for Young Children With Severe Disabilities Purpose This research investigated the use of a dynamic assessment (DA) to identify differences among young children with severe disabilities, which would predict progress in learning behaviors indicating coordinated joint attention (CJA). Method Six children 10–24 months of age were enrolled in a 16-week treatment for behaviors indicating ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 2013
Validating Dynamic Assessment of Triadic Gaze for Young Children With Severe Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lesley B. Olswang
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Julie L. Feuerstein
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Gay Lloyd Pinder
    Children's Therapy Center, Kent, WA
  • Patricia Dowden
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Correspondence to Lesley B. Olswang: lolswang@uw.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Teresa Ukrainetz
    Associate Editor: Teresa Ukrainetz×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 2013
Validating Dynamic Assessment of Triadic Gaze for Young Children With Severe Disabilities
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2013, Vol. 22, 449-462. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/12-0013)
History: Received February 8, 2012 , Revised July 25, 2012 , Accepted December 18, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2013, Vol. 22, 449-462. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/12-0013)
History: Received February 8, 2012; Revised July 25, 2012; Accepted December 18, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose This research investigated the use of a dynamic assessment (DA) to identify differences among young children with severe disabilities, which would predict progress in learning behaviors indicating coordinated joint attention (CJA).

Method Six children 10–24 months of age were enrolled in a 16-week treatment for behaviors indicating CJA, specifically triadic gaze (TG), which is a 3-point gaze shift between object and adult. An initial static assessment documented the children's eligibility for the study and their baseline performance of TG. DA procedures were then implemented to determine each child's performance with examiner support in producing behaviors suggesting joint attention (i.e., tracking, gaze toward an object or an adult, scanning between objects, scanning an object and adult, and TG).

Results Results demonstrated differences among children during the DA via a DA score and a behavioral profile. These results were predictive of differences among children in subsequent learning of TG.

Conclusion These data support the validity of DA for describing heterogeneity among young children with severe disabilities who look similar on static assessment but appear differentially ready to learn behaviors associated with joint attention. This knowledge will assist clinicians in planning more efficacious services for young children who struggle to communicate and are at risk for extended therapeutic needs.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, Treatment for Triadic Gaze (5P01HD018955).
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