Speech Motor Programming in Apraxia of Speech: Evidence From a Delayed Picture-Word Interference Task Purpose Apraxia of speech (AOS) is considered a speech motor programming impairment, but the specific nature of the impairment remains a matter of debate. This study investigated 2 hypotheses about the underlying impairment in AOS framed within the Directions Into Velocities of Articulators (DIVA; Guenther, Ghosh, & Tourville, 2006) model: ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   May 01, 2013
Speech Motor Programming in Apraxia of Speech: Evidence From a Delayed Picture-Word Interference Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marja-Liisa Mailend
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Edwin Maas
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Correspondence to Marja-Liisa Mailend: mailend@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Editor: Swathi Kiran×
  • Associate Editor: Diane Kendall
    Associate Editor: Diane Kendall×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Supplement: Select Papers From the 42nd Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   May 01, 2013
Speech Motor Programming in Apraxia of Speech: Evidence From a Delayed Picture-Word Interference Task
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, S380-S396. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0101)
History: Received July 30, 2012 , Accepted January 17, 2013
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, S380-S396. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0101)
History: Received July 30, 2012; Accepted January 17, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose Apraxia of speech (AOS) is considered a speech motor programming impairment, but the specific nature of the impairment remains a matter of debate. This study investigated 2 hypotheses about the underlying impairment in AOS framed within the Directions Into Velocities of Articulators (DIVA; Guenther, Ghosh, & Tourville, 2006) model: The retrieval hypothesis states that access to the motor programs is impaired, and the damaged programs hypothesis states that the motor programs themselves are damaged.

Method The experiment used a delayed picture-word interference paradigm in which participants prepare their response and auditory distracters are presented with the go signal. The overlap between target and distracter words was manipulated (i.e., shared sounds or no shared sounds), and participants' reaction times (RTs) were measured. Participants included 5 speakers with AOS (4 with concomitant aphasia), 2 speakers with aphasia without AOS, and 9 age-matched control speakers.

Results The control speakers showed no effects of distracter type or presence. The speakers with AOS had longer RTs in the distracter condition compared to the no-distracter condition. The speakers with aphasia without AOS were comparable to the control group in their overall RTs and RT pattern.

Conclusion Results provide preliminary support for the retrieval hypothesis, suggesting that access to motor programs may be impaired in speakers with AOS. However, the possibility that the motor programs may also be damaged cannot be ruled out.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a New Century Scholars Research Grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (PI: Edwin Maas). Portions of these data were presented at the 42nd Clinical Aphasiology Conference (Research Symposium in Clinical Aphasiology fellowship awarded to M.-L. Mailend) and at the International Workshop of Language Production 2012 (H.E. Carter Travel Award and the SLHS Travel Award awarded to M.-L. Mailend).
We thank Ashley Chavez, Lauren Crane, Rachel Grief, Allison Koenig, and Ariel Maglinao for assistance with data collection and analysis; Janet Hawley for assistance with participant recruitment; Pélagie Beeson and Gayle DeDe for providing background information about participants; and Kindle Rising and Andrew DeMarco for interpretation of MRI scans. Finally, we thank our participants for their time.
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