An Aphasia Mentoring Program: Perspectives of Speech-Language Pathology Students and of Mentors With Aphasia Purpose In contrast to clinician-as-expert models, social models of clinical practice typically acknowledge people with aphasia as equal partners in intervention. Given this, there may be a place within speech-language pathology education for programs situating people with aphasia as experts. This paper describes an aphasia mentoring program that was implemented ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   May 01, 2013
An Aphasia Mentoring Program: Perspectives of Speech-Language Pathology Students and of Mentors With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara A. Purves
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Jill Petersen
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Gloria Puurveen
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Correspondence to Barbara A. Purves: purves@audiospeech.ubc.ca
  • Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Editor: Swathi Kiran×
  • Associate Editor: Brooke Hallowell
    Associate Editor: Brooke Hallowell×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Select Papers From the 42nd Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   May 01, 2013
An Aphasia Mentoring Program: Perspectives of Speech-Language Pathology Students and of Mentors With Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, S370-S379. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0071)
History: Received July 23, 2012 , Accepted January 17, 2013
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, S370-S379. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0071)
History: Received July 23, 2012; Accepted January 17, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose In contrast to clinician-as-expert models, social models of clinical practice typically acknowledge people with aphasia as equal partners in intervention. Given this, there may be a place within speech-language pathology education for programs situating people with aphasia as experts. This paper describes an aphasia mentoring program that was implemented as part of a speech-language pathology graduate program.

Method Qualitative research methods with thematic analysis of interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, and participant observation were used to develop a description of the mentoring program, including the experiences and perspectives of the participants—both mentors (people with chronic aphasia) and students.

Results Five themes, including getting better, aphasia advocacy, group as versus for therapy, we're a team, and focus on mentoring, emerged from the mentors' data. Five themes, including shifting the power dynamic, getting to know the person, seeing members as mentors, making classroom learning real, and connecting with a community, emerged from the students' data. There were significant overlaps and intersections between the 2 data sets.

Conclusion Findings revealed how an aphasia mentoring program that positions people with aphasia as experts can make a significant contribution to student education while supporting mentors' own goals, with implications for improved quality of life.

Acknowledgment
The Aphasia Mentoring Program is supported by a grant from the Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund of the University of British Columbia.
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