Rehabilitation in Bilingual Aphasia: Evidence for Within- and Between-Language Generalization Purpose The goal of this study was to examine if there was a principled way to understand the nature of rehabilitation in bilingual aphasia such that patterns of acquisition and generalization are predictable and logical. Method Seventeen Spanish–English bilingual individuals with aphasia participated in the experiment. For each ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   May 2013
Rehabilitation in Bilingual Aphasia: Evidence for Within- and Between-Language Generalization
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Swathi Kiran
    Boston University, MA
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Chaleece Sandberg
    Boston University, MA
  • Teresa Gray
    Boston University, MA
  • Elsa Ascenso
    Boston University, MA
  • Ellen Kester
    Bilinguistics, Austin, TX
  • Correspondence to Swathi Kiran: kirans@bu.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Heather Wright
    Associate Editor: Heather Wright×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Select Papers From the 42nd Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   May 2013
Rehabilitation in Bilingual Aphasia: Evidence for Within- and Between-Language Generalization
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, S298-S309. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0085)
History: Received July 28, 2012 , Revised November 29, 2012 , Accepted January 6, 2013
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, S298-S309. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0085)
History: Received July 28, 2012; Revised November 29, 2012; Accepted January 6, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3
Acknowledgments
A portion of this research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R21DC009446 and a Clinical Research Grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation to the first author. The authors would like to thank Danielle Tsibulsky, Anne Alvarez, and Rajani Sebastian for their assistance in data collection and analysis. The authors would also like to thank all of the participants for their time and cooperation.

Purpose The goal of this study was to examine if there was a principled way to understand the nature of rehabilitation in bilingual aphasia such that patterns of acquisition and generalization are predictable and logical.

Method Seventeen Spanish–English bilingual individuals with aphasia participated in the experiment. For each participant, three sets of stimuli were developed for each language: (a) English Set 1, (b) English Set 2 (semantically related to each item in English Set 1), (c) English Set 3 (unrelated control items), (d) Spanish Set 1 (translations of English Set 1), (e) Spanish Set 2 (translations of English Set 2; semantically related to each item in Spanish Set 1), and (f) Spanish Set 3 (translations of English Set 3; unrelated control items). A single-subject experimental multiple baseline design across participants was implemented. Treatment was conducted in 1 language, but generalization to within- and between-language untrained items was examined.

Results Treatment for naming on Set 1 items resulted in significant improvement (i.e., effect size >4.0) on the trained items in 14/17 participants. Of the 14 participants who showed improvement, within-language generalization to semantically related items was observed in 10 participants. Between-language generalization to the translations of trained items was observed in 5 participants, and between-language generalization to the translations of the untrained semantically related items was observed in 6 participants.

Conclusion The results of this study demonstrated within- and between-language patterns that were variable across participants. These differences are indicative of the interplay between facilitation (generalization) and inhibition.

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