Suppression and Narrative Time Shifts in Adults With Right-Hemisphere Brain Damage Purpose This study examined the functioning of a central comprehension mechanism, suppression, in adults with right-hemisphere damage (RHD) while they processed narratives that cued a shift in time frame. In normal language comprehension, mental activation of concepts from a prior time frame is suppressed. The (re)activation of information following a ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   May 01, 2013
Suppression and Narrative Time Shifts in Adults With Right-Hemisphere Brain Damage
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Victoria L. Scharp
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Connie A. Tompkins
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Correspondence to Victoria L. Scharp: scharpvl@hotmail.com
  • Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Editor: Swathi Kiran×
  • Associate Editor: Richard Peach
    Associate Editor: Richard Peach×
Article Information
Special Populations / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Supplement: Select Papers From the 42nd Clinical Aphasiology Conference
Supplement Article   |   May 01, 2013
Suppression and Narrative Time Shifts in Adults With Right-Hemisphere Brain Damage
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, S256-S267. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/12-0072)
History: Received July 24, 2012 , Revised October 1, 2012 , Accepted December 12, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, S256-S267. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/12-0072)
History: Received July 24, 2012; Revised October 1, 2012; Accepted December 12, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose This study examined the functioning of a central comprehension mechanism, suppression, in adults with right-hemisphere damage (RHD) while they processed narratives that cued a shift in time frame. In normal language comprehension, mental activation of concepts from a prior time frame is suppressed. The (re)activation of information following a time frame shift was also assessed.

Method Twenty adults (12 RHD; 8 non brain–damaged) completed a speeded word recognition task while listening to narratives in 2 conditions: shift (“an hour later”) and no shift (“a moment later”).

Results There was no group difference in suppression for response time proportion data (shift/no shift), but cluster analyses identified a suppression deficit in 8 of the adults with RHD. There was overlap in suppression function at the narrative and lexical levels. The group with RHD was significantly delayed in mentally (re)activating new information after a time shift cue.

Conclusion Results underscore the generality of suppression functioning in adults with RHD. As such, treatment for a suppression deficit at one level may generalize to another level. An apparent independence of suppression and activation deficits suggests that each may need separate treatment. A better understanding of the nature and boundary conditions of suppression and activation deficits should better inform clinical decisions.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this manuscript were supported by the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Student Development Fund to the first author and a grant (DC0101182) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to the second author.
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