Acoustic Characteristics of Simulated Respiratory-Induced Vocal Tremor Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation of respiratory forced oscillation to the acoustic characteristics of vocal tremor. Method Acoustical analyses were performed to determine the characteristics of the intensity and fundamental frequency (F0) for speech samples obtained by Farinella, Hixon, Hoit, Story, and ... Research Note
Research Note  |   May 01, 2013
Acoustic Characteristics of Simulated Respiratory-Induced Vocal Tremor
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rosemary A. Lester
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Brad H. Story
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Correspondence to Rosemary A. Lester: ralester@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Rebecca Leonard
    Associate Editor: Rebecca Leonard×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Notes
Research Note   |   May 01, 2013
Acoustic Characteristics of Simulated Respiratory-Induced Vocal Tremor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, 205-211. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/12-0043)
History: Received May 29, 2012 , Accepted October 16, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, 205-211. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/12-0043)
History: Received May 29, 2012; Accepted October 16, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation of respiratory forced oscillation to the acoustic characteristics of vocal tremor.

Method Acoustical analyses were performed to determine the characteristics of the intensity and fundamental frequency (F0) for speech samples obtained by Farinella, Hixon, Hoit, Story, and Jones (2006)  using a respiratory forced oscillation paradigm with 5 healthy adult males to simulate vocal tremor involving respiratory pressure modulation. The analyzed conditions were sustained productions of /a/ with amplitudes of applied pressure of 0, 1, 2, and 4 cmH2O and a rate of 5 Hz.

Results Forced oscillation of the respiratory system produced modulation of the intensity and F0 for all participants. Variability was observed between participants and conditions in the change in intensity and F0 per unit of pressure change, as well as in the mean intensity and F0. However, the extent of modulation of intensity and F0 generally increased as the applied pressure increased, as would be expected.

Conclusion These findings suggest that individuals develop idiosyncratic adaptations to pressure modulations, which are important to understanding aspects of variability in vocal tremor, and highlight the need to assess all components of the speech mechanism that may be directly or indirectly affected by tremor.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by the Thomas J. Hixon Doctoral Fellowship. We would like to thank Kimberly Farinella for sharing these data and the associated laboratory documentation. We would also like to thank Jeannette Hoit for her contributions to the interpretation of these results in light of results from previous unpublished studies within the Speech Research Laboratory at the University of Arizona.
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