Pragmatic Language Assessment in Williams Syndrome: A Comparison of the Test of Pragmatic Language—2 and the Children's Communication Checklist—2 Purpose Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are recognized as having a strong desire for social relationships, yet many of them have difficulty forming and maintaining peer relationships. One cause may be impairments in pragmatic language. The current study compared the assessment of pragmatic language skills in individuals with WS using ... Research Note
Research Note  |   May 01, 2013
Pragmatic Language Assessment in Williams Syndrome: A Comparison of the Test of Pragmatic Language—2 and the Children's Communication Checklist—2
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne Hoffmann
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Marilee A. Martens
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Robert Fox
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Paula Rabidoux
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Rebecca Andridge
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Correspondence to Anne Hoffmann: hoffmann.255@osu.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Juliann Woods
    Associate Editor: Juliann Woods×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Research Notes
Research Note   |   May 01, 2013
Pragmatic Language Assessment in Williams Syndrome: A Comparison of the Test of Pragmatic Language—2 and the Children's Communication Checklist—2
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, 198-204. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0131)
History: Received October 20, 2011 , Revised May 14, 2012 , Accepted October 15, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, 198-204. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0131)
History: Received October 20, 2011; Revised May 14, 2012; Accepted October 15, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are recognized as having a strong desire for social relationships, yet many of them have difficulty forming and maintaining peer relationships. One cause may be impairments in pragmatic language. The current study compared the assessment of pragmatic language skills in individuals with WS using the Test of Pragmatic Language—Second Edition (TOPL–2; Phelps-Terasaki & Phelps-Gunn, 2007) and the Children's Communication Checklist—Second Edition (CCC–2; Bishop, 2003).

Method Twenty children and adolescents diagnosed with WS were given the TOPL–2, and their parents completed the CCC–2.

Results The TOPL–2 identified 8 of the 14 older children (ages 8–16 years) as having pragmatic language impairment and all of the 6 younger children (ages 6–7 years) as having such. In comparison, the CCC–2 identified 6 of the 14 older children and 2 of the 6 younger children as having pragmatic language impairment. The older group also had a higher composite score than the younger group on the CCC–2.

Conclusion The TOPL–2 identified significantly more participants as having pragmatic language impairment than did the CCC–2. The TOPL–2 may be more useful in assessing pragmatic language in older children than younger children. The results offer important preliminary clinical implications of language measures that may be beneficial in the assessment of individuals with WS.

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