Specific Language Impairment and Executive Functioning: Parent and Teacher Ratings of Behavior Purpose The current study used the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function—Preschool Version (BRIEF–P; Gioia, Espy, & Isquith, 2003), a rating scale designed to investigate executive behaviors in everyday activities, to examine the executive functioning of preschool children with specific language impairment (SLI) relative to their typically developing (TD) peers. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2013
Specific Language Impairment and Executive Functioning: Parent and Teacher Ratings of Behavior
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kacie Wittke
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Tammie J. Spaulding
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Calli J. Schechtman
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Correspondence to Tammie J. Spaulding: tammie.spaulding@uconn.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Teresa Ukrainetz
    Associate Editor: Teresa Ukrainetz×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2013
Specific Language Impairment and Executive Functioning: Parent and Teacher Ratings of Behavior
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, 161-172. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0052)
History: Received May 18, 2011 , Revised December 4, 2011 , Accepted October 1, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2013, Vol. 22, 161-172. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0052)
History: Received May 18, 2011; Revised December 4, 2011; Accepted October 1, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

Purpose The current study used the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function—Preschool Version (BRIEF–P; Gioia, Espy, & Isquith, 2003), a rating scale designed to investigate executive behaviors in everyday activities, to examine the executive functioning of preschool children with specific language impairment (SLI) relative to their typically developing (TD) peers.

Method Nineteen preschool children with SLI were age- and gender-matched to 19 TD peers. Both parents and teachers of the participants completed the BRIEF–P.

Results The executive functioning of children with SLI were rated significantly worse than those of controls by both parents and teachers. Adults' perceptions of the children's executive functioning significantly correlated with the children's language abilities.

Conclusion Parent and teacher perceptions of executive functioning in children with SLI align with prior findings of executive deficits that have been documented on neuropsychological assessments and experimental tasks. Furthermore, the results provide additional supporting evidence of the relationship between language abilities and executive functioning in early child development.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a UConn Foundation large faculty grant to the second author.
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