Production and Maternal Report of 16- and 18-Month-Olds' Vocabulary in Low- and Middle-Income Families Purpose To compare maternal report of children’s vocabularies on the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories Words and Gestures form (CDI:WG; Fenson et al., 1993) with spontaneous production data in both low- and middle-income families. Method As part of a longitudinal investigation, language samples were gathered from 23 mother–child dyads ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2011
Production and Maternal Report of 16- and 18-Month-Olds' Vocabulary in Low- and Middle-Income Families
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan E. Furey
    The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH
  • Contact author: Joan E. Furey, Department of Communication, The College of Wooster, Wishart Hall, Wooster, OH 44691. E-mail: jfurey@wooster.edu.
Article Information
Development / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2011
Production and Maternal Report of 16- and 18-Month-Olds' Vocabulary in Low- and Middle-Income Families
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2011, Vol. 20, 38-46. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0073)
History: Received August 13, 2009 , Revised March 8, 2010 , Accepted September 30, 2010
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2011, Vol. 20, 38-46. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0073)
History: Received August 13, 2009; Revised March 8, 2010; Accepted September 30, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose To compare maternal report of children’s vocabularies on the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories Words and Gestures form (CDI:WG; Fenson et al., 1993) with spontaneous production data in both low- and middle-income families.

Method As part of a longitudinal investigation, language samples were gathered from 23 mother–child dyads based on Stoel-Gammon’s (1987)  protocol for the Language Production Scale when the children were 16 and 18 months of age. The mothers also completed the CDI:WG at both visits. The words that the children produced were compared with those the mothers reported on the vocabulary checklist, with family income and vocabulary size as grouping factors.

Results Maternal reporting did not differ as a function of socioeconomic status but did increase from 16 to 18 months.

Conclusions The vocabulary differences observed on the CDI:WG for children from low-income families do not appear to be a reflection of inaccurate maternal reporting. Further research is needed to determine whether these findings will generalize more broadly.

Acknowledgments
A previous version of this article was presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in San Diego, CA, in November 2005. I am grateful to the families who participated in the longitudinal investigation that was completed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Support for the data collection was provided by a Student Research Grant in Early Childhood Language from the ASHFoundation, the Bamford-Lahey Children’s Foundation, and a Robert L. Sprague Thesis Award. Partial support for this project was provided by an ASHA Advancing Academic–Research Careers Award. I am grateful to Chris Dollaghan and Margaret Wick for their valuable comments on earlier drafts of this article. In addition, I want to thank Gary Gillund for his advice regarding the statistical analyses. I want to acknowledge Brookelyn Anhalt, Catherine Capo, Kristen Conklin, Naomi Dunn, Jamie Fox, Laura Geller, Brianne Kosch, Angela Locantore, Stephanie Mancini, Kaitlan O’Malley, Abby Prospero, Carrie Smith, and Natalie Unger for their assistance transcribing and checking the data.
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