Research Article  |   February 2011
Script Training Treatment for Adults With Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Scott R. Youmans
    Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY
  • Adrienne B. Hancock
    George Washington University, Washington, DC
  • Contact author: Gina Youmans, Long Island University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1 University Plaza, Brooklyn, NY 11210. E-mail: gina.youmans@liu.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Article
Research Article   |   February 2011
Script Training Treatment for Adults With Apraxia of Speech
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2011, Vol. 20, 23-37. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0085)
History: Received September 3, 2009 , Revised March 19, 2010 , Accepted August 19, 2010
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2011, Vol. 20, 23-37. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0085)
History: Received September 3, 2009; Revised March 19, 2010; Accepted August 19, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose: Outcomes of script training for individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS) and mild anomic aphasia were investigated. Script training is a functional treatment that has been successful for individuals with aphasia but has not been applied to individuals with AOS. Principles of motor learning were incorporated into training to promote long-term retention of scripts.

Method: Three individuals with AOS completed script training. A multiple-baseline, across-behaviors design examined acquisition of client-selected scripts. Errors and speaking rates were also analyzed. Random practice and delayed feedback were incorporated into training to promote motor learning. Probes for long-term retention were elicited up to 6 months after treatment.

Results: All clients successfully acquired their scripts, and probes demonstrated script retention 6 months after treatment. Errors generally decreased but remained variable even during maintenance and retention probes. Speaking rate increased for 2 clients but also remained variable.

Conclusions: Script training was successful and functional for clients with AOS. Clients reported increased confidence, speaking ease, and speech naturalness. Although scripts did not become errorless, clients retained their scripts and reported using them frequently. Whether principles of motor learning may have promoted the long-term retention of scripts exhibited by participants must be determined through future research.

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