Identification of Adults With Developmental Language Impairments Purpose To assess the utility of a wide range of language measures (phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics) for the identification of adults with developmental language impairment. Method Measures were administered to 3 groups of adults, each representing a population expected to demonstrate high levels of language impairment, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2011
Identification of Adults With Developmental Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lesley J. Fidler
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Elena Plante
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Rebecca Vance
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Elena Plante, The University of Arizona, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, P.O. Box 210071, Tucson, AZ 85721-0071. E-mail: eplante@u.arizona.edu.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Reading & Writing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2011
Identification of Adults With Developmental Language Impairments
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2011, Vol. 20, 2-13. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0096)
History: Received October 26, 2009 , Revised March 28, 2010 , Accepted July 20, 2010
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2011, Vol. 20, 2-13. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0096)
History: Received October 26, 2009; Revised March 28, 2010; Accepted July 20, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 19

Purpose To assess the utility of a wide range of language measures (phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics) for the identification of adults with developmental language impairment.

Method Measures were administered to 3 groups of adults, each representing a population expected to demonstrate high levels of language impairment, and to matched control groups.

Results Three measures were the strongest contributors to identification of language impairment in the 3 groups of adults. These measures, combined, maximized identification of members of the clinical groups as having impaired language (sensitivity) and members of the control groups as having typical language (specificity).

Conclusion This suggests that a relatively brief battery could have utility for identifying developmental language impairment during the adult years.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC R21 DC007917 to the second author. The data on the sentence generation task were presented at the 2009 meeting of the Society for Research in Child Language Disorders in Madison, WI.
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