Research Article  |   February 2011
Establishing Validity of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard I. Zraick
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
  • Gail B. Kempster
    Rush University, Chicago, IL
  • Susan Thibeault
    University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Bernice K. Klaben
    University of Cincinnati Physicians, West Chester, OH
  • Carol R. Thrush
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Leslie E. Glaze
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Richard I. Zraick, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Mail Slot 772, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205. E-mail: zraickrichardi@uams.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Research Article
Research Article   |   February 2011
Establishing Validity of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2011, Vol. 20, 14-22. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0105)
History: Received December 3, 2009 , Revised May 3, 2010 , Accepted July 28, 2010
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2011, Vol. 20, 14-22. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0105)
History: Received December 3, 2009; Revised May 3, 2010; Accepted July 28, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 15

Purpose: The Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V) was developed to provide a protocol and form for clinicians to use when assessing the voice quality of adults with voice disorders (Kempster, Gerratt, Verdolini Abbott, Barkmeier-Kramer, & Hillman, 2009). This study examined the reliability and the empirical validity of the CAPE-V when used by experienced voice clinicians judging normal and disordered voices.

Method: The validity of the CAPE-V was examined in 2 ways. First, we compared judgments made by 21 raters of 22 normal and 37 disordered voices using the CAPE-V and the GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, strain; see Hirano, 1981) scales. Second, we compared our raters' judgments of overall severity to a priori consensus judgments of severity for the 59 voices.

Results: Intrarater reliability coefficients for the CAPE-V ranged from .82 for breathiness to .35 for strain; interrater reliability ranged from .76 for overall severity to .28 for pitch.

Conclusions: Although both CAPE-V and GRBAS reliability coefficients varied across raters and parameters, this study reports slightly improved rater reliability using the CAPE-V to make perceptual judgments of voice quality in comparison to the GRBAS scale. The results provide evidence for the empirical (concurrent) validity of the CAPE-V.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a noncompetitive project grant to the first author from ASHA’s Special Interest Division 3 (Voice and Voice Disorders). The following individuals served in a volunteer capacity as expert raters in this study (listed in alphabetical order): Gayle Belin, Julie Blair, Linda Carroll, Kathleen Cox, Marina Gilman, Michael Hammer, Edie Hapner, Barbara Jacobsen, Christine Martin, Beth McWeeny, Diana Orbelo, Rita Patel, Brian Petty, Hylan Pickett, Julia Rademacher, Cara Sauder, Martin Spencer, Tonya Thomason, Michael Trudeau, Miriam van Mersbergen, and Nathan Welham. UAMS graduate students Jennipher Taylor, Sarah Kennedy, and Cherin Pace assisted with preparation of the study materials and data entry and management. Steve Gorman, Wendy DeLeo LeBorgne, and Jennifer Rettig at the Blaine Block Institute for Voice Analysis and Rehabilitation retrieved the dysphonic voice samples used in this study. Edward Carney, Research Associate at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, performed Harshberger’s multiserial correlation to compare select data from CAPE-V and GRBAS judgments.
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