The Effect of Feedback and Practice on the Acquisition of Novel Speech Behaviors Purpose: This study examined the effect of manipulating several parameters of motor learning theory on participants' phonetic acquisition and retention of utterances in a foreign language (Korean).Method: Thirty-two native English-speaking participants naïve to the Korean language were each given 10 Korean sentences to practice and learn. The independent ... Research
Research  |   May 2012
The Effect of Feedback and Practice on the Acquisition of Novel Speech Behaviors
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • In-sop Kim
    University of Maine, Orono
  • Leonard L. LaPointe
    Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Julie A. G. Stierwalt
    Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Correspondence to In-sop Kim: insop.kim@umit.maine.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Velleman
    Associate Editor: Shelley Velleman×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Research   |   May 2012
The Effect of Feedback and Practice on the Acquisition of Novel Speech Behaviors
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2012, Vol. 21, 89-100. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0082)
History: Received September 8, 2009 , Revised March 27, 2010 , Accepted December 29, 2011
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2012, Vol. 21, 89-100. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0082)
History: Received September 8, 2009; Revised March 27, 2010; Accepted December 29, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose: This study examined the effect of manipulating several parameters of motor learning theory on participants' phonetic acquisition and retention of utterances in a foreign language (Korean).

Method: Thirty-two native English-speaking participants naïve to the Korean language were each given 10 Korean sentences to practice and learn. The independent variables in the study were the number of practice trials and the feedback schedule. The participants listened to sentences delivered by a native speaker and received feedback according to the schedule. Participant responses were then judged by a panel of native Korean speakers in terms of their intelligibility, naturalness, and precision.

Results: The combination of 20% feedback and 100 practice trials was more effective than other combinations of feedback and practice trial schedule for the retention of novel phonetic productions of Korean phrases both 1 day after training and 1 week later.

Conclusions: These findings are in agreement with previously reported applications of motor learning–guided principles on the acquisition of motoric skills. These findings may have direct implications for both second-language learning and the treatment of neuromotor speech disorders such as apraxia of speech.

Acknowledgments
I sincerely thank Richard J. Morris of Florida State University and Rolf A. Zwaan of Erasmus University, The Netherlands, for their discerning comments, thoughtful discussion, and constant encouragement on this study.
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