Orthographic Word Knowledge Growth in School-Age Children Purpose Natural reading experiences provide an opportunity for the development of orthographic word knowledge as well as other forms of partial word knowledge. The purpose of this study was to compare the orthographic word knowledge growth of school-age children with relatively low language skills (LL group) to that of age- ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2012
Orthographic Word Knowledge Growth in School-Age Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stacy A. Wagovich
    University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Youngju Pak
    University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Margaret D. Miller
    University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Correspondence to Stacy Wagovich: wagovichs@health.missouri.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Sandra Gillam
    Associate Editor: Sandra Gillam×
Article Information
Development / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2012
Orthographic Word Knowledge Growth in School-Age Children
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2012, Vol. 21, 140-153. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/10-0032)
History: Received March 25, 2010 , Revised September 30, 2010 , Accepted January 9, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2012, Vol. 21, 140-153. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/10-0032)
History: Received March 25, 2010; Revised September 30, 2010; Accepted January 9, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose Natural reading experiences provide an opportunity for the development of orthographic word knowledge as well as other forms of partial word knowledge. The purpose of this study was to compare the orthographic word knowledge growth of school-age children with relatively low language skills (LL group) to that of age- and gender-matched peers with high language skills (HL group).

Method Thirty-two children, 16 per group, read stories containing rare words 3 times, 2–3 days apart. Posttesting, completed at the end of each session, required participants to indicate recognition of the rare words encountered in the stories while not indicating recognition of orthographically similar nonwords.

Results Over time, both groups showed significant growth in recognition of the orthographic forms of the rare words. However, the groups differed in the extent to which they indicated that the orthographically similar nonwords were words, with the LL group indicating that significantly more of the nonwords were words.

Conclusion Results provide some preliminary evidence that children with relatively weaker language skills are able to develop orthographic knowledge of unfamiliar words through reading experiences, but their orthographic representations may not be as well defined as those of children with stronger language skills.

Acknowledgments
This work was funded by Grant R03DC006827-01A1 awarded to the first author by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the following students and former students: Kristin Lamvik, Chesney Moore, Christine Gray, Jessica Colwell, and Rose Aiazzi.
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