Review  |   November 2011
Language in the Cerebellum
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Clifford L. Highnam
    University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
  • Ken M. Bleile
    University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
  • Correspondence to Clifford L. Highnam: clifford.highnam@uni.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Laura Green
    Associate Editor: Laura Green×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Review
Review   |   November 2011
Language in the Cerebellum
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2011, Vol. 20, 337-347. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/10-0096)
History: Received November 9, 2010 , Revised March 29, 2011 , Accepted May 15, 2011
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2011, Vol. 20, 337-347. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/10-0096)
History: Received November 9, 2010; Revised March 29, 2011; Accepted May 15, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose: To explore increasingly compelling evidence that the adult human cerebellum is involved in nonmotor affective and cognitive activity, including language—functions that have in the past been associated largely with the limbic system and the cerebral cortex.

Method: We review clinical studies of patients with cerebellar lesions, nonclinical neuroimaging studies of individuals engaged in completing selected tasks, and neuroanatomical as well as neuroimaging studies of brain interconnections. In the course of this review, we also report on a variety of hypotheses regarding the nature of the cerebellum’s work in affective processing and language/cognition.

Results: This review suggests that the cerebellum has considerable influence in language processing and other related higher level affective/cognitive activities.

Conclusion: We conclude with a preliminary list of important clinical implications of these results.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to recognize the helpful assistance of Paul Evitts and RaKeesha Reeves-Pelt while they were graduate research assistants at the University of Northern Iowa. We are also grateful to our colleagues Todd Bohnenkamp and Judith Harrington at the University of Northern Iowa for their careful reading of the manuscript.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access