A Qualitative Study of Interference With Communicative Participation Across Communication Disorders in Adults Purpose To explore the similarities and differences in self-reported restrictions in communicative participation across different communication disorders in community-dwelling adults. Method Interviews were conducted with 44 adults representing 7 different medical conditions: spasmodic dysphonia, multiple sclerosis, stroke, stuttering, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and laryngectomy. This article represents ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   November 01, 2011
A Qualitative Study of Interference With Communicative Participation Across Communication Disorders in Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carolyn Baylor
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Michael Burns
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Tanya Eadie
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Deanna Britton
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn Yorkston
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Correspondence to Carolyn Baylor: cbaylor@u.washington.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Patrick Finn
    Associate Editor: Patrick Finn×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2011
A Qualitative Study of Interference With Communicative Participation Across Communication Disorders in Adults
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2011, Vol. 20, 269-287. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/10-0084)
History: Received October 7, 2010 , Accepted May 30, 2011
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2011, Vol. 20, 269-287. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/10-0084)
History: Received October 7, 2010; Accepted May 30, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 29

Purpose To explore the similarities and differences in self-reported restrictions in communicative participation across different communication disorders in community-dwelling adults.

Method Interviews were conducted with 44 adults representing 7 different medical conditions: spasmodic dysphonia, multiple sclerosis, stroke, stuttering, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and laryngectomy. This article represents a secondary analysis of qualitative data collected in cognitive interviews during development of the Communicative Participation Item Bank. The data were analyzed to identify themes in participants' experiences related to communicative participation.

Results Participants described many situations in which they experienced interference in communicative participation. Two themes emerged from the data. The first theme was Interference is both “functional” and “emotional,” in which participants defined interference as limitations in accomplishing tasks and emotional consequences. The second theme was “It depends”—sources of interference, in which participants described many variables that contribute to interference in participation. Participants had limited control of some variables such as symptoms and environmental contexts, but personal decisions and priorities also influenced participation.

Conclusions Despite different impairments and activity limitations, participants described similar communicative participation restrictions. These similarities may have theoretical and clinical implications in terms of how we assess, treat, and study the participation restrictions associated with communication disorders.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by the following funding sources: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 1R03DC010044-01 to the first author, National Cancer Institute Grant 1R03CA132525-01A1 to the third author, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Grant H133P080008 to Deborah Kartin, and National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research Grants T32-HD-00742416A1 and 1R21 HD 45882-01 to the fifth author. We would like to thank the participants for their generosity in terms of sharing their time and their insights with us. We would also like to acknowledge the other investigators who assisted in the interviews: Dagmar Amtmann, Jean Deitz, Brian Dudgeon, and Robert Miller, all at the University of Washington. Thank you to the University of Washington Multiple Sclerosis Rehabilitation and Research Training Center and the University of Washington Speech and Hearing Clinic for assistance in recruitment.
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