From the Editor  |   November 2011
The Importance of Participant Demographics
 
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  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
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Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / From the Editor
From the Editor   |   November 2011
The Importance of Participant Demographics
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2011, Vol. 20, 261. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/ed-04)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2011, Vol. 20, 261. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/ed-04)
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2
In 1993, the National Institutes of Health issued guidelines that required the inclusion of members of “minority groups” in funded research projects (National Institutes of Health, 2001). As a result, attention has been placed on increasing the diversity of research participants and describing the demographic characteristics of participants when presenting findings in journal articles. For example, in 2001, the fifth edition of the American Psychological Association’s Publication Manual highlighted the need to provide specific information about participants' characteristics, including their racial/ethnic group membership and socioeconomic status (SES). Despite this emphasis, two recent reviews of ASHA journals revealed that less than half of the articles published over a 10-year period provided information about the race/ethnicity and SES of participants (Ellis, 2009; Ingelbret, Skinder-Meredith, Kellison, & Contreras-France, 2010).
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