Evaluation of a Deductive Procedure to Teach Grammatical Inflections to Children With Language Impairment Purpose To evaluate the learning effects of a deductive language-teaching procedure when teaching a novel gender agreement verb inflection to children with language impairment. Method Thirty-two 6–8-year-old children with language impairment were randomly assigned to either a deductive (N = 16) or an inductive (N = 16) treatment ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2009
Evaluation of a Deductive Procedure to Teach Grammatical Inflections to Children With Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lizbeth H. Finestack
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Contact author: Lizbeth H. Finestack, who is now at Waisman Center, Room 529A, University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705. E-mail: finestack@waisman.wisc.edu.
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2009
Evaluation of a Deductive Procedure to Teach Grammatical Inflections to Children With Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2009, Vol. 18, 289-302. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/08-0041)
History: Received June 12, 2008 , Revised November 12, 2008 , Accepted January 25, 2009
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2009, Vol. 18, 289-302. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/08-0041)
History: Received June 12, 2008; Revised November 12, 2008; Accepted January 25, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Purpose To evaluate the learning effects of a deductive language-teaching procedure when teaching a novel gender agreement verb inflection to children with language impairment.

Method Thirty-two 6–8-year-old children with language impairment were randomly assigned to either a deductive (N = 16) or an inductive (N = 16) treatment group. In the deductive treatment, the examiner presented a rule guiding the novel inflection to be learned as well as models of the inflection. In the inductive treatment, only models of the verb inflection were presented. Learning was assessed in 3 different production contexts during each of 4 treatment sessions.

Results Significantly more participants in the deductive group than the inductive group acquired the novel morpheme based on a teaching probe (10 vs. 3), generalization probe (10 vs. 3), and maintenance probe (7 vs. 2). Task performance was not significantly influenced by language ability or nonverbal intelligence.

Conclusions The deductive teaching procedure was found to be efficacious when teaching a novel grammatical inflection. However, this effect was limited because treatment gains varied across participants, testing contexts, and sessions. Future studies should continue to examine the efficacy of deductive procedures when integrated into traditional implicit approaches for children with language impairment.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by scholarships from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation and the Bamford-Lahey Foundation, and a Dissertation Fellowship from the University of Kansas Graduate School.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access