An Objective and Time-Efficient Method for Determining Severity of Childhood Speech Delay To address the need for an efficient and valid approach to determining the severity of a child’s speech delay, this study compared 2 types of sampling procedures to derive a measure of percentage of consonants correct (PCC; L. D. Shriberg & J. Kwiatkowski, 1982). PCC scores of twenty-one 4- to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2004
An Objective and Time-Efficient Method for Determining Severity of Childhood Speech Delay
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol A. Johnson
    Nampa School District, Nampa, ID
  • Audrey D. Weston
    Idaho State University-Boise
  • Barbara A. Bain
    Idaho State University-Pocatello
  • Contact author: Carol A. Johnson, Nampa School District, 619 South Canyon, Nampa, ID 83686.
    Contact author: Carol A. Johnson, Nampa School District, 619 South Canyon, Nampa, ID 83686.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: dcjohns1@mindspring.com
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2004
An Objective and Time-Efficient Method for Determining Severity of Childhood Speech Delay
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2004, Vol. 13, 55-65. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/007)
History: Received September 27, 2002 , Accepted May 12, 2003
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2004, Vol. 13, 55-65. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/007)
History: Received September 27, 2002; Accepted May 12, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

To address the need for an efficient and valid approach to determining the severity of a child’s speech delay, this study compared 2 types of sampling procedures to derive a measure of percentage of consonants correct (PCC; L. D. Shriberg & J. Kwiatkowski, 1982). PCC scores of twenty-one 4- to 6-year-old children with speech delay derived from both an imitative sentence task and a conversational task were compared. Scores did not differ significantly and corresponded favorably with a reference criterion (S. M. Benner, 1992) for determining clinical equivalence. The imitative approach required considerably less time to complete. Thus, the sentence imitation procedure offers a valid and efficient alternative to conversational sampling. However, clinicians should consider individual child characteristics when choosing an imitative approach.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on a master’s thesis completed by the first author in partial fulfillment of requirements for a Master of Science Degree in Speech-Language Pathology at Idaho State University Boise Center, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology. The research project was awarded a grant from the Graduate Student Research and Scholarship Committee, Idaho State University. The work was completed with the support of Nampa School District colleagues Nancy Freeby, Connie Henrickson, Jennifer Marion, Nancy Schroeder, Vicky Stewart, and Cheri Turner, who provided potential participants, assistance with reliability, and constructive suggestions.
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