Enhancing Socially Adaptive Communicative Repairs of Beginning Communicators With Disabilities Young children with significant disability often have limited communicative repertoires. The means they have available to communicate with others might include natural gesturing, vocalizing, and occasionally challenging behavior. These forms frequently are unconventional, ambiguous, and idiosyncratic and are therefore difficult for partners to understand. As a result of these compromised ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   February 01, 2004
Enhancing Socially Adaptive Communicative Repairs of Beginning Communicators With Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jim Halle, PhD
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Nancy C. Brady
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Erik Drasgow
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Contact author: James W. Halle, PhD, Department of Special Education, University of Illinois, 1310 S. Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820, or Nancy Brady, PhD, Schiefelbusch Institute for Lifespan Studies, 1000 Sunnyside Drive, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045.
    Contact author: James W. Halle, PhD, Department of Special Education, University of Illinois, 1310 S. Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820, or Nancy Brady, PhD, Schiefelbusch Institute for Lifespan Studies, 1000 Sunnyside Drive, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: halle@uiuc.edu
Article Information
Clinical Forum: Intervention Strategies for Severe Disabilities
Clinical Forum   |   February 01, 2004
Enhancing Socially Adaptive Communicative Repairs of Beginning Communicators With Disabilities
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2004, Vol. 13, 43-54. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/006)
History: Received January 14, 2004 , Accepted January 21, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2004, Vol. 13, 43-54. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/006)
History: Received January 14, 2004; Accepted January 21, 2004

Young children with significant disability often have limited communicative repertoires. The means they have available to communicate with others might include natural gesturing, vocalizing, and occasionally challenging behavior. These forms frequently are unconventional, ambiguous, and idiosyncratic and are therefore difficult for partners to understand. As a result of these compromised repertoires, communication breakdowns are the rule rather than the exception and the children’s capacity to repair these breakdowns becomes critical. This article focuses on communication breakdowns and repairs by (a) identifying and defining their variations, (b) providing a rationale for their importance (especially for children with substantial language delays), and (c) developing a conceptual framework to facilitate their assessment and to assist in the design of interventions that are logically related to the assessment results. Guidelines for conducting the assessments and for implementing the interventions are provided.

Acknowledgments
Support for writing this article was provided through U.S. Department of Education Grant H324C020098 and National Institutes of Health Grant 5PO1HD198955.
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