From the Editor Adisturbing trend within the profession has recently developed concerning the requirement of specialized certificates for providing certain types of speech-language interventions. Typically, authors of these clinical programs require that speech-language pathologists attend a course or workshop conducted over several days at substantial cost to become “certified” providers of their ... Editorial
Editorial  |   February 01, 2004
From the Editor
 
Author Notes
  • Editor
    Editor×
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   February 01, 2004
From the Editor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2004, Vol. 13, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/001)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2004, Vol. 13, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/001)
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2
Adisturbing trend within the profession has recently developed concerning the requirement of specialized certificates for providing certain types of speech-language interventions. Typically, authors of these clinical programs require that speech-language pathologists attend a course or workshop conducted over several days at substantial cost to become “certified” providers of their particular treatment approach. As noted by Janet Brown (2003, ¶3), ASHA’s director of health care services in speech-language pathology, “these courses suggest that competence in using the technique can only be achieved by taking the course.” Furthermore, they suggest that clinical competence is a “negotiable commodity” (Brown, 2003, ¶1). The latter inference has clear ethical implications.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access