Children's Story Retelling Under Different Modality and Task Conditions Implications for Standardizing Language Sampling Procedures Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2003
Children's Story Retelling Under Different Modality and Task Conditions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jamie Gazella
    University of Michigan Hospitals
  • Ida J. Stockman
    Michigan State University
  • Contact author: Jamie C. Gazella, 3356 Bent Trail Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48108. E-mail: gazellaj@umich.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2003
Children's Story Retelling Under Different Modality and Task Conditions
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 61-72. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/053)
History: Received August 1, 2001 , Accepted April 8, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 61-72. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/053)
History: Received August 1, 2001; Accepted April 8, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 22

This study was motivated by the possibility of standardizing a story-retelling task well enough to function as a brief screener of children's global syntactic features. Specifically, the study determined whether the story presentation modality (i.e., audio-only or combined auditory and visual presentation) differentially influenced the quantity of talk, its lexical diversity and sentence complexity, as expressed in children's retold story narratives and responses to direct questions about the story. Twenty-nine Caucasian male preschoolers, who ranged in age from 4;2 to 5;6 (years;months), were randomly assigned to a modality presentation condition. The audio-only group did not differ significantly from the audiovisual group in the amount of talk, lexical diversity, or syntactic complexity of sentences used in the narratives or responses to direct questions. Nevertheless, the story-retelling task yielded the longest and most grammatically complete utterances. Responses to direct questions yielded the largest number of utterances and different words. The clinical implications of these results for standardizing language sampling are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Gratitude is extended to Melissa McGowen for her assistance with the data collection. The authors are also grateful to Hien Van Luu for his support with data transcription and to Bonnie Gazella, Gary Gazella, and Jodie Gazella for character voices, enactments, and filming. This project was supported in part by funds provided by the Kappa Kappa Gamma Foundation.
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