The Influence of Information and Role-Playing Experiences on Children's Attitudes Toward Peers Who Use AAC A school-based intervention designed to increase the positive nature of children's attitudes toward peers who use AAC is described. Small groups of children were given only information about AAC or they were given information about AAC and the opportunity to role-play being nonspeaking. Results indicated a greater positive effect of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2003
The Influence of Information and Role-Playing Experiences on Children's Attitudes Toward Peers Who Use AAC
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann R. Beck
    Illinois State University, Normal
  • Heidi Fritz-Verticchio
    Illinois State University, Normal
  • Contact author: Ann R. Beck, Campus Box 4720, Normal, IL 61790. E-mail: arbeck@ilstu.edu
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2003
The Influence of Information and Role-Playing Experiences on Children's Attitudes Toward Peers Who Use AAC
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 51-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/052)
History: Received November 7, 2001 , Accepted March 19, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 51-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/052)
History: Received November 7, 2001; Accepted March 19, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

A school-based intervention designed to increase the positive nature of children's attitudes toward peers who use AAC is described. Small groups of children were given only information about AAC or they were given information about AAC and the opportunity to role-play being nonspeaking. Results indicated a greater positive effect of the information plus role-play experience compared to the effects of being given information alone for older children and boys. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank the children, teachers, administrators, and parents who made the collection of these data possible. The authors also wish to note that both authors contributed equally to this research and that author order reflects alphabetical order only. Thanks also go to Jaime Poulos and Jessica Prochnow for their help in conducting this research. One poster session presented at the 1999 ASHA Convention in San Francisco was based on portions of the data contained herein.
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