Phonological Profiles of 2-Year-Olds With Delayed Language Development Predicting Clinical Outcomes at Age 3 Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2003
Phonological Profiles of 2-Year-Olds With Delayed Language Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cecyle Perry Carson
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Thomas Klee
    University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, England
  • David K. Carson
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Linda K. Hime
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Contact author: Dr. Cecyle Perry Carson, Division of Communication Disorders, University of Wyoming, University Station, Box 3311, Laramie, WY 82071-3311. E-mail: ckperry@uwyo.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2003
Phonological Profiles of 2-Year-Olds With Delayed Language Development
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 28-39. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/050)
History: Received September 10, 2001 , Accepted February 22, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 28-39. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/050)
History: Received September 10, 2001; Accepted February 22, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 18

Twenty-eight 2-year-olds were screened for language development using the Language Development Survey (LDS; L. Rescorla, 1989) and underwent a clinical evaluation within a month following LDS administration. Six measures of phonological development were derived from 20-min language samples of parent-child play interactions, including number of different consonants, number of different consonants in the initial and final positions, number of different consonant clusters in the initial and final position, and percentage of closed syllables shapes. Comparisons were made among 3 groups: (a) those who screened positive on the LDS (LDS+) who were within normal limits on follow-up, (b) those who were identified as language delayed (LD), and (c) children who were language normal (LN). Results revealed that children who were LDS+ and LD had comparable phonetic profiles. The LD group had significantly lower scores on all phonetic measures tested, as compared to the LN group. Clinical recommendations were available on a subset of 13 children who were reassessed at age 3. Children who received "monitor" or "treatment" recommendations at age 3 had significantly lower z scores on measures of phonetic development recorded at 2 years of age than toddlers who received a recommendation of "no concerns" at 3 years. Our preliminary findings indicated that the more delayed the 2-year-old child was in phonological development, the more at risk the child was for continuing delays at age 3.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank the families who allowed their children to participate in this study. They also acknowledge the critical contributions of Dr. Cynthia Johnson. This project was funded in part by the Kahn Foundation, University of Wyoming. A portion of this work was presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Boston, 1997.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access