From the Editor As a clinical journal, AJSLP has received a number of manuscripts in the past year that describe the outcomes of a variety of interventions for speech and language disorders. In many instances, the studies purported to assess the efficacy or the effectiveness of the treatments under investigation even though ... Editorial
Editorial  |   February 01, 2003
From the Editor
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   February 01, 2003
From the Editor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/047)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/047)
As a clinical journal, AJSLP has received a number of manuscripts in the past year that describe the outcomes of a variety of interventions for speech and language disorders. In many instances, the studies purported to assess the efficacy or the effectiveness of the treatments under investigation even though these efforts included small numbers of participants or no control groups in their experimental designs. And, in each instance, the reviews provided to the authors pointed out that these conditions preclude such studies from being considered as efficacy or effectiveness studies. The frequency of this problem suggests that a brief discussion of the current model for treatment outcomes research might be beneficial for both the researchers who conduct these studies and the clinicians who employ the results.
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