The Fruitfulness of a Nomothetic Approach to Investigating AAC Comparing Two Speech Encoding Schemes Across Cerebral Palsied and Nondisabled Children Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2003
The Fruitfulness of a Nomothetic Approach to Investigating AAC
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dave D. Hochstein
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Mark A. McDaniel
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Sandra Nettleton
    Albuquerque Public Schools, NM
  • Katherine Hannah Neufeld
    Clayton County Public Schools, Atlanta, GA
  • Contact author: Dave D. Hochstein, Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Logan Hall, Terrace and Redondo Streets, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131. E-mail: hochd@unm.edu
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2003
The Fruitfulness of a Nomothetic Approach to Investigating AAC
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 110-120. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/057)
History: Received September 13, 2001 , Accepted May 23, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2003, Vol. 12, 110-120. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/057)
History: Received September 13, 2001; Accepted May 23, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

The observation that typical users of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems vary widely in their characteristics raises issues about the utility of a nomothetic approach for investigating and evaluating important variables, as well as about the value of studying children without disabilities to contribute to the understanding of AAC systems. To provide an initial basis for examining the fruitfulness of the nomothetic approach, the effects of 2 fundamental variables, number of display levels (single vs. dual) and vocabulary abstractness (concrete vs. abstract words), on vocabulary acquisition were examined for children without disabilities and for speech impaired children with cerebral palsy (CP). Children demonstrated the same pattern of acquisition, regardless of disability status. Both groups of children made more errors on the dual-level display than on the single-level display and made more abstract errors than concrete errors. Importantly, the performance of individuals consistently conformed to group performance. These findings suggest that a nomothetic research approach that includes results of children without disabilities can usefully illuminate consequences of important variables in AAC systems. Clinical implications based on these findings were also discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC03110. We thank the children who generously gave of their time to participate in this study.
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