Accuracy of Online Language Sampling A Focus on Verbs Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2002
Accuracy of Online Language Sampling
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan E. Furey
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Ruth V. Watkins
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Contact author: Joan E. Furey, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: furey@uiuc.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2002
Accuracy of Online Language Sampling
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2002, Vol. 11, 434-439. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/046)
History: Received September 4, 2001 , Accepted February 21, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2002, Vol. 11, 434-439. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/046)
History: Received September 4, 2001; Accepted February 21, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

This study investigated the accuracy of online language sample data collection. Language samples were collected from 22 preschoolers (11 with language impairments and 11 typically developing) using a semiscripted, play-based sampling procedure designed to elicit 50 target verbs. During each sampling session, examiners recorded the target verbs a child produced. The online target verb repertoire for each child was then compared with the target verb repertoire extracted from transcription of the audiotape. Results indicated strong positive correlations between target verb repertoires recorded online and those obtained from transcription. Our results indicate that online transcription can be a useful procedure for clinicians who may be restricted in their ability to use language sampling procedures because of the significant time required for transcription and subsequent sample analysis. Although the current study revealed strong accuracy in online recording for one relatively focused aspect of language production, additional investigation will be needed to evaluate real-time recording for a broader range of linguistic abilities.

Acknowledgments
Partial support for the preparation of this manuscript was provided by USDE/OSEP training grant H029D60035. Previous versions of this article were presented at the Annual Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders, Madison, WI, June 2000, and at the Annual American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in Washington, DC, November 2000. The authors wish to acknowledge the assistance of Rachel Schilling Aupperle, Kelly Purgett, and Vera Joanna Burton.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access