Chant Therapy For Treating Vocal Fatigue Among Public School Teachers A Preliminary Study Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2002
Chant Therapy For Treating Vocal Fatigue Among Public School Teachers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel J. McCabe
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Ingo R. Titze
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Contact Author: Daniel J. McCabe, Bath VAMC 76/202B, Bath NY 14810. E-mail: Dan.McCabe@med.va.gov
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2002
Chant Therapy For Treating Vocal Fatigue Among Public School Teachers
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2002, Vol. 11, 356-369. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/040)
History: Received November 12, 2001 , Accepted November 29, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2002, Vol. 11, 356-369. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/040)
History: Received November 12, 2001; Accepted November 29, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 21

Voice therapies have proven to be an effective method of helping patients avoid the symptoms of vocal fatigue. This study assesses the effect of a chant-based therapy on self-perceptive symptoms of vocal fatigue. A recitational pattern was selected and a therapy regime created from important features of this chant. It was administered along with a placebo therapy to four public school teachers who were prone to vocal fatigue. A two-hour fatiguing task was administered pre- and post-therapies, during which self-evaluative measures of "vocal effort" and "voice quality" were made by the subjects. The plots of these measures were used for the purpose of determining the effects of the chant therapy. Based on changes in the subjects' responses to the fatiguing task after the delivery of the chant therapy, we concluded that this form of functional therapy has the potential to be effective in the remediation of vocal fatigue.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by grant # R01 DC04224-01 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. It was significantly based on Daniel McCabe's Master's thesis, done in partial fulfillment of the Masters of Arts degree in Speech Pathology and Audiology at the University of Iowa in 1999.
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