Treating Phonological Disorders in a Multilingual Child A Case Study Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2002
Treating Phonological Disorders in a Multilingual Child
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jayanti Ray, PhD
    Washington State University, Pullman
  • Contact author: Jayanti Ray, PhD, Daggy 201, P.O. Box 642420, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 E-mail: rayj@wsu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2002
Treating Phonological Disorders in a Multilingual Child
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2002, Vol. 11, 305-315. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/035)
History: Received April 18, 2001 , Accepted December 4, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2002, Vol. 11, 305-315. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/035)
History: Received April 18, 2001; Accepted December 4, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

This study was undertaken to examine the efficacy of cognitive-linguistic approach in treating a phonological disorder in a five-year-old trilingual child. The child's native languages were Hindi and Gujarati, with English acquired during preschool. The child's speech was mildly unintelligible, characterized by normal as well as deviant phonological processes and inconsistent errors in all three languages. A cognitive-linguistic approach that incorporated process elimination and minimal contrast therapies was used to treat the phonological disorders in English only. Posttherapeutic assessment after five months of treatment indicated significant improvements in the child's overall speech intelligibility in all three languages, indicating generalization. It may be hypothesized that a multilingual child is likely to use a common phonological system that may be shared by two or more languages during early learning stages. Clinical implications regarding assessment and intervention for bilingual/multilingual children with disordered phonology are discussed.

Acknowledgment
The author would like to thank the client (MC) and his parents for their participation in this study. A very special gratitude is forwarded to Dr. Gail Chermak, Chair, Speech and Hearing Sciences, for editing the manuscript and for providing her thoughtful comments on the earlier forms of this manuscript. I wish to thank Dr. Bleile and two anonymous reviewers for their help in preparing the final paper. I would also like to thank two anonymous speech pathologists for assistance with data transcription.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access