Evaluating Articulation and Phonological Disorders When the Clock Is Running The clinical evaluation of communication is a key element in the therapeutic process. This paper describes an approach to an initial clinical evaluation of a preschool-aged child referred to a clinic for problems in communication. Topics addressed in the evaluation include: What is the purpose of the evaluation? In which ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   August 01, 2002
Evaluating Articulation and Phonological Disorders When the Clock Is Running
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ken Bleile, PhD
    University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
  • Contact author: Ken Bleile, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, 238 Communication Arts Center, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50514-0356. E-mail: ken.bleile@uni.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Phonology
Clinical Forum   |   August 01, 2002
Evaluating Articulation and Phonological Disorders When the Clock Is Running
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2002, Vol. 11, 243-249. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/026)
History: Received November 13, 2000 , Accepted April 5, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2002, Vol. 11, 243-249. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/026)
History: Received November 13, 2000; Accepted April 5, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

The clinical evaluation of communication is a key element in the therapeutic process. This paper describes an approach to an initial clinical evaluation of a preschool-aged child referred to a clinic for problems in communication. Topics addressed in the evaluation include: What is the purpose of the evaluation? In which setting should the evaluation be held? What aspects of the client's background may contribute to his or her possible communication disorder? How are speech and language assessed in only 60 to 90 minutes? How is hearing assessed? What information should be conveyed to the client's family? The author's general approach to clinical evaluation emphasizes the importance of nonstandardized assessment procedures for obtaining the case history and for collecting and analyzing speech and language samples. The author focuses on linguistic-motor aspects of articulation and phonology disorders and emphasizes the importance of evaluating both the child's major speech errors as well as his or her better speech-making abilities.

Acknowledgments
I wish to thank Susan Anderson, Emily Coussens, Sarah Rasmussen, and Darla Sharar for reading and commenting on an earlier draft of this paper.
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