Five Views of the Elephant Perspectives on the Assessment of Articulation and Phonology in Preschoolers Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   August 01, 2002
Five Views of the Elephant
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann A. Tyler
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • Leslie C. Tolbert
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • Adele W. Miccio
    The Pennsylvania State University
  • Paul R. Hoffman
    Louisiana State University
  • Janet A. Norris
    Louisiana State University
  • Barbara Hodson
    Wichita State University
  • Julie Scherz
    Wichita State University
  • Ken Bleile, PhD
    University of Northern Iowa
  • Contact author: Ken Bleile, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, 238 Communication Arts Center, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50514-0356. E-mail: ken.bleile@uni.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Phonology
Clinical Forum   |   August 01, 2002
Five Views of the Elephant
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2002, Vol. 11, 213-214. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/021)
History: Received February 20, 2002 , Accepted April 5, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2002, Vol. 11, 213-214. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/021)
History: Received February 20, 2002; Accepted April 5, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5
Assessment of communication disorders is a critical component in the clinical process. The clinical wisdom of assessment is reflected in the ethical guidelines of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. These guidelines require an assessment for purposes of clinical decision-making and for determining if therapy services are warranted. Clinical assessments to determine eligibility for therapy services also are mandated by law and by third-party payers. In addition to being used to approve or deny services for therapy, most clinicians regularly use assessments for myriad clinical purposes from goal setting to goal outcome. On any given day a clinician may assess one client to determine if therapy is needed, assess another to ascertain therapy progress, assess a third to help make a differential diagnosis, and assess yet another dynamically.
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