A Preliminary Report on Treatment of Contact Granuloma With Steroid Injections This preliminary report discusses the effects of intralesion local steroid injection for treatment of contact granulomas. Four men between the ages of 39 and 59 years and one woman age 33 years, who were diagnosed with contact granulomas and who failed previous management attempts, are discussed. Intralesion steroid injections of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1998
A Preliminary Report on Treatment of Contact Granuloma With Steroid Injections
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael A. Crary
    University of Florida Health Science Center, Gainesville
  • Christine M. Sapienza
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Nicholas J. Cassisi
    University of Florida Health Science Center, Gainesville
  • G. Paul Moore
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Contact author: Michael A. Crary, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, P.O. Box 100174, University of Florida Health Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32610
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Healthcare Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1998
A Preliminary Report on Treatment of Contact Granuloma With Steroid Injections
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 92-96. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.92
History: Received August 15, 1997 , Accepted January 21, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 92-96. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.92
History: Received August 15, 1997; Accepted January 21, 1998

This preliminary report discusses the effects of intralesion local steroid injection for treatment of contact granulomas. Four men between the ages of 39 and 59 years and one woman age 33 years, who were diagnosed with contact granulomas and who failed previous management attempts, are discussed. Intralesion steroid injections of triamcinolone were completed in an otolaryngology outpatient clinic. Results showed that the size of contact granulomas was reduced with injection of the steroid in all five patients. Contact granuloma was completely eliminated in one patient. Furthermore, all patients were clinically asymptomatic 3 to 4 months post-injection, although only two of the five granulomas were totally eliminated at the time of long-term follow-up. Clinical improvement was confirmed by direct laryngoscopic evaluation of contact granuloma size 4 months following completion of the steroid injections. A speech-language pathologist's knowledge of this technique may prevent patients with granuloma from enduring protracted voice treatment that is historically less effective. The speech-language pathologist's responsibilities include determining patient candidacy for intralesion steroid injection, assisting the otolaryngologist with endoscopic interpretation of the lesion pre- and post-intervention, and tracking the clinical outcome of the procedure.

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