Speech Breathing in Able-Bodied Children and Children With Cerebral Palsy A Review of the Literature and Implications for Clinical Intervention Tutorial
Tutorial  |   May 01, 1998
Speech Breathing in Able-Bodied Children and Children With Cerebral Palsy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Pearl Solomon
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Sandy Charron
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Nancy Pearl Solomon, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
  • * Currently affiliated with Merit Care Hospital, Fargo, ND.
    Currently affiliated with Merit Care Hospital, Fargo, ND.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Tutorials
Tutorial   |   May 01, 1998
Speech Breathing in Able-Bodied Children and Children With Cerebral Palsy
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 61-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.61
History: Received August 29, 1997 , Accepted February 25, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 61-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.61
History: Received August 29, 1997; Accepted February 25, 1998

Management of the communication problems of children with cerebral palsy presents many challenges to speech-language pathologists. In this paper, we focus on one aspect of that challenge, speech breathing. To understand the nature of speech breathing problems in children with dysarthria, it is necessary tohave a thorough knowledge of speech breathing in able-bodied children. In the first part of this paper, we review this literature according to four parameters: air pressure, lung volume, air flow, and chest wall shape. Incorporated into this section are data and clinical reports of speech breathing in children with cerebral palsy. In the second part of this paper, we have provided management suggestions for the speech-language pathologist working with children with cerebral palsy. These include the general topics of muscle weakness and incoordination, body positioning, and neurodevelopmental treatment. Throughout this review, it becomes clear that little information regarding either the nature or the treatment of speech breathing in children with cerebral palsy is available and that there is a definite need for basic research as well as treatment efficacy studies.

Acknowledgments
We express our sincere appreciation to Dr. Ronald Netsell, Dr. Elaine Stathopoulos, and an anonymous reviewer for insightful and constructive comments on previous versions of this manuscript. Also, our thanks are extended to Ms. Amy McKee for expert editing of this manuscript.
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