Phonological Assessment and Treatment of Bilingual Speakers Given the demographic changes currently taking place in the United States, speech-language pathologists increasingly are being asked to provide speech and language services to bilingual speakers. The acquisition of more than one language presents unique challenges to speech-language pathologists in the assessment of and intervention for phonological disorders. This paper ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   May 01, 1998
Phonological Assessment and Treatment of Bilingual Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mehmet Yavas
    Florida International University, Miami
  • Brian Goldstein
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Contact author: Brian Goldstein, PhD, Temple University, Department of Communication Sciences, 109 Weiss Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19122 E-mail: goldstba@nimbus.temple.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Tutorials
Tutorial   |   May 01, 1998
Phonological Assessment and Treatment of Bilingual Speakers
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 49-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.49
History: Received June 10, 1997 , Accepted December 10, 1997
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 49-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.49
History: Received June 10, 1997; Accepted December 10, 1997

Given the demographic changes currently taking place in the United States, speech-language pathologists increasingly are being asked to provide speech and language services to bilingual speakers. The acquisition of more than one language presents unique challenges to speech-language pathologists in the assessment of and intervention for phonological disorders. This paper provides speech-language pathologists information about common and uncommon phonological patterns across a variety of languages, the influence of the sound patterns of one language on another, and guidelines for assessment and intervention.

Author Note
Special thanks to the Saint Louis University Research Group and Lynda Campbell for reading an earlier draft of this paper. Thanks also to Aquiles Iglesias, Kathi Kohnert-Rice, and Barbara Mastriano for discussions on intervention. Portions of this paper were presented at the Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Orlando, Florida in November 1995.
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