From the Editor Occasionally, when things get so busy I don’t know which way to turn, I take pause and think about what I like best about the jobs I do. Somehow, it helps me deal with the daily grind to think of ways in which the tasks that seem to lead ... Editorial
Editorial  |   May 01, 1998
From the Editor
 
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Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   May 01, 1998
From the Editor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.02
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.02
Occasionally, when things get so busy I don’t know which way to turn, I take pause and think about what I like best about the jobs I do. Somehow, it helps me deal with the daily grind to think of ways in which the tasks that seem to lead me away from my most immediate goals really serve me well in the long run. My work with AJSLP is a prime example. Clearly, this job takes a great deal of time and energy; so, what’s in it for me?
The answer to this question could occupy a full afternoon of musing and would take me well beyond the length allowed for this column. I benefit in many ways in my role as editor. Near the top of my list, though, is the fact that my editing requires me to read a broad spectrum of articles, including those well outside my professional specialty areas. It came as no shock to me to find it exciting and intensely rewarding to review the latest work of authors interested in children’s phonological and language disorders; these are my primary teaching and research interest areas. On the other hand, I have been surprised by the great pleasure I have found in reading articles on such diverse topics as stuttering, swallowing, aphasia, and traumatic brain injury. This reading not only reorients me to the field at large, but it helps me to examine clinical and research problems and problem-solving methods from the perspectives of those who do different types of work in different work settings. It also helps me to see the differences and, just as importantly, the commonalities among speech-language professionals who deal, at least superficially, with dramatically different topics. My reading and reviewing have led me to fascinating and fruitful professional interactions with individuals with whom I might otherwise have shared few common interests and objectives.
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