A Survey of Expressive Communication Skills in Children With Angelman Syndrome Angelman syndrome (AS) results from partial deletion of the 15th chromosome (Knoll et al., 1989) and occurs in approximately 1 per 10,000 live births (Petersen, Brondum-Nielsen, Hansen, & Wulff, 1995). Individuals with AS exhibit a pattern of developmental delays that include feeding problems in infancy, delays in motor development, ataxic ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 1998
A Survey of Expressive Communication Skills in Children With Angelman Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robin L. Alvares
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb
  • Sharon F. Downing
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb
  • Contact author: Robin L. Alvares, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 1998
A Survey of Expressive Communication Skills in Children With Angelman Syndrome
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 14-24. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.14
History: Received May 29, 1997 , Accepted January 21, 1998
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1998, Vol. 7, 14-24. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0702.14
History: Received May 29, 1997; Accepted January 21, 1998

Angelman syndrome (AS) results from partial deletion of the 15th chromosome (Knoll et al., 1989) and occurs in approximately 1 per 10,000 live births (Petersen, Brondum-Nielsen, Hansen, & Wulff, 1995). Individuals with AS exhibit a pattern of developmental delays that include feeding problems in infancy, delays in motor development, ataxic movements, seizures, severe to profound mental retardation, and a lack of expressive speech (Williams, Zori, et al., 1995). The purposes of this article are to summarize clinical research on AS, to provide a description of the communication skills of individuals with AS, and to identify strategies and resources for communication intervention. It begins by reviewing the existing literature on the clinical characteristics of individuals with AS, with an emphasis on communication skills. The second part of the article presents results obtained from a survey of 20 families of children with AS on the children's expressive communication skills. The implications of the findings of the survey are discussed relative to the existing literature.

Acknowledgments
The auth ors wish to thank the families of the children with Angelman syndrome who participated in the survey, the reviewers for their helpful comments, and Drs. Charles Williams and Daniel Harvey for their assistance in interpreting the genetic information. Sharon and Rick Mason are to be commended for their dedication, support, and prodding. This article is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Harry S. Angelman, who passed away in Fall 1996.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access