Teachers’ Conceptions of Their Role in Improving Students’ Preparation for Clinical Work in Dysphagia Disordered swallowing profoundly influences one's constitution, with significant consequences of morbidity and mortality from malnutrition, dehydration, and respiratory tract complications (Cook, 1991). The management of oropharyngeal swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) is now the largest recognized subspecialty within speech-language pathology (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association [ASHA], 1996; Miller & Groher, 1993). Practicing speech-language ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   November 01, 2001
Teachers’ Conceptions of Their Role in Improving Students’ Preparation for Clinical Work in Dysphagia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ingrid Scholten
    Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia
  • Contact author: Ingrid M. Scholten, Department of Speech Pathology, School of Medicine, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia, GPO Box 2100, ADELAIDE, 5001.
    Contact author: Ingrid M. Scholten, Department of Speech Pathology, School of Medicine, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia, GPO Box 2100, ADELAIDE, 5001.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: ingrid.scholten@flinders.edu.au
Article Information
Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   November 01, 2001
Teachers’ Conceptions of Their Role in Improving Students’ Preparation for Clinical Work in Dysphagia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2001, Vol. 10, 343-357. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/029)
History: Received November 21, 2000 , Accepted March 8, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2001, Vol. 10, 343-357. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/029)
History: Received November 21, 2000; Accepted March 8, 2001
Disordered swallowing profoundly influences one's constitution, with significant consequences of morbidity and mortality from malnutrition, dehydration, and respiratory tract complications (Cook, 1991). The management of oropharyngeal swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) is now the largest recognized subspecialty within speech-language pathology (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association [ASHA], 1996; Miller & Groher, 1993). Practicing speech-language pathologists require a comprehensive theoretical and functional knowledge base to underpin the safe and effective management of people with dysphagia. Speech-language pathology graduates should possess the skills needed to approach this area of their clinical caseload with optimum competency and confidence, so the way in which this material is taught and learned is critically important.
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