Discourse Formulation in Children With Closed Head Injury In this study, narrative and expository discourse-retelling abilities were compared in 9 children with closed head injury (CHI) age 9;5–15;3 (years;months) and 9 typically developing age-matched peers. Narrative and expository retellings were analyzed according to language variables (i.e., number of words, number of T-units, and sentential complexity) and information variables ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2005
Discourse Formulation in Children With Closed Head Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Emma Hay
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Catherine Moran
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Contact author: Catherine Moran, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Contact author: Catherine Moran, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: catherine.moran@canterbury.ac.nz
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2005
Discourse Formulation in Children With Closed Head Injury
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2005, Vol. 14, 324-336. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/031)
History: Received June 26, 2004 , Revised March 8, 2005 , Accepted August 25, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2005, Vol. 14, 324-336. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/031)
History: Received June 26, 2004; Revised March 8, 2005; Accepted August 25, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 17

In this study, narrative and expository discourse-retelling abilities were compared in 9 children with closed head injury (CHI) age 9;5–15;3 (years;months) and 9 typically developing age-matched peers. Narrative and expository retellings were analyzed according to language variables (i.e., number of words, number of T-units, and sentential complexity) and information variables (i.e., number of propositions, number of episodic structure elements, and number of global structure elements). A measure of participants’ ability to generate a story moral or aim was also taken. The children with CHI differed significantly from their age-matched peers across language and information domains and in their ability to formulate a moral or aim in both the expository and narrative retellings. In addition, differences across genre were found with performance on narrative tasks superior to performance on expository tasks. The exception was that it was easier for participants to generate an aim for the expository passage than a story moral for the narrative passage. The results are discussed relative to a working memory theory of impairment following CHI. Future directions for research are proposed.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to acknowledge the cooperation of the children and families who took part in this study. This study was based on a master’s project completed in the Department of Communication Disorders at the University of Canterbury by the first author and under the supervision of the second author.
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